Nick Hardwick (executive)

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Nick Hardwick
Nick Hardwick.jpg
Her Majesty's Chief Inspector of Prisons
In office
2010–2016
Preceded byDame Anne Owers
Succeeded byPeter Clarke

Nick Hardwick (born 19 July 1957) is an English executive who has led UK-based charities and criminal justice organisations. Most recently he was chair of the Parole Board for England and Wales from March 2016 until his resignation on 28 March 2018 following a legal challenge to a Parole Board decision to release convicted rapist John Worboys.

Early life[edit]

Nick Hardwick was born on 19 July 1957,[1] in Surrey.[citation needed] He was educated at Epsom College and the University of Hull, where he earned a third class honours degree in English Literature in 1979.[2][3]

Career[edit]

From 1986 to 1995 he was chief executive of the charity Centrepoint.[4]

From June 1995 to January 2003, he was chief executive of the Refugee Council.[5]

Hardwick was appointed in December 2002 as the chair of the Independent Police Complaints Commission, taking office in February 2003; the IPCC existed in shadow form from 1 April 2003, and formally replaced the Police Complaints Authority on 1 April 2004.[6] As IPCC chair he defended its investigations which included enquiries into the death of Jean Charles de Menezes and the policing of the 2009 G20 London summit protests.[7]

From July 2010, he was Her Majesty's Chief Inspector of Prisons,[8] replacing Anne Owers.

Hardwick was appointed chair of the Parole Board for England and Wales in March 2016, and resigned on 28 March 2018 following a successful legal challenge which led to the quashing of the Parole Board decision to release John Worboys from prison on licence.[9] Hardwick had played no role in the decision of the Board's panel, but said he took "accountability for the work of the Board", and, after being told by the Secretary of State for Justice (David Gauke) that his position was untenable, resigned with immediate effect.[10] He was succeeded by Caroline Corby.[11]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Weekend birthdays". The Guardian. Guardian Media. 19 July 2014. p. 52.
  2. ^ HARDWICK, Nicholas Lionel, Who's Who 2016, A & C Black, an imprint of Bloomsbury Publishing plc, 2016
  3. ^ The Week. 27 February 2016. condensing an interview first published in The Guardian.
  4. ^ "Nick Hardwick Biography". Web.archive.org. 14 June 2009. Retrieved 9 November 2018.
  5. ^ [1][dead link]
  6. ^ "Independent Police Complaints Commission Home Department written statement – made on 12th December 2002". They Work For You. Retrieved 28 March 2018.
  7. ^ Travis, Alan (3 March 2010). "IPCC head to become chief inspector of prisons". The Guardian. Retrieved 28 March 2018.
  8. ^ "Frequently asked questions - HMI Prisons". Web.archive.org. 7 November 2009. Retrieved 9 November 2018.
  9. ^ "Parole Board chairman to resign". BBC News. BBC. 28 March 2018. Retrieved 28 March 2018.
  10. ^ Grierson, Jamie; Travis, Alan (28 March 2018). "Parole Board chair forced to quit over John Worboys ruling". Guardian. Retrieved 28 March 2018.
  11. ^ Shaw, Danny (9 November 2018). "Parole Board has 240 members - none black". Bbc.co.uk. Retrieved 9 November 2018.
Non-profit organization positions
Preceded by
Alf Dubs
Chief Executive of the Refugee Council
1995–2003
Succeeded by
Maeve Sherlock
Government offices
Preceded by
Anne Owers
Her Majesty's Chief Inspector of Prisons
2010–2016
Succeeded by
Peter Clarke