Noah Kraft

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Noah Kraft
Noah Kraft, Doppler Labs, CEO & Co-Founder.jpg
Kraft in 2017
Born Noah Alexander Kraft
Los Angeles, California
Citizenship American
Alma mater Brown University
Occupation Chief Executive, Entrepreneur
Organization Doppler Labs, Bleed for This, Clown & Sunset Aesthetics, 300 Entertainment
Spouse(s) Caroline Straty Kraft
Website https://hereplus.me/pages/about

Noah Kraft is a media and technology executive and entrepreneur. Most recently, he was the CEO and co-founder of the San Francisco-based audio technology company, Doppler Labs[1] which he co-founded with Fritz Lanman in 2013.[2]

Early life and education[edit]

Kraft was born In Los Angeles, California and attended Oakwood School in North Hollywood, California. He graduated from Brown University with a dual degree in International Relations and History.[3][4]

Career[edit]

In 2009, Kraft was hired by Chad Verdi to be the Chief Operating Officer of Verdi Productions.[5] Kraft developed and produced several films for Verdi Productions including Bleed for This, a boxing biopic about Rhode Island boxer Vinny Pazienza starring Miles Teller and Aaron Eckhart.[6] The film was executive produced by Martin Scorsese who Kraft met in 2011 to recruit for the film. Bleed for This debuted at the Toronto International Film Festival in September 2016[7] and was released in theaters on November 18, 2016. It was named a Critic’s Pick by the New York Times.[8]

In 2011, Kraft Co-Founded Clown & Sunset Aesthetics (CSA) with electronic musician Nicolas Jaar.[9] CSA was an interdisciplinary production house that was home to the Clown & Sunset record label, released the first ever Darkside album and Don't Break My Love on "The Prism," and produced immersive multimedia events like "From Scratch" at MoMA PS1.[10]

In 2013, Kraft co-founded the audio technology company Doppler Labs where he served as CEO. At its peak, Doppler Labs employed 75 people and raised over $50 Million in the pursuit of redefining the field of in-ear technology. Doppler labs produced three products: DUBS Acoustic Filters, high-tech ear plugs that reduced volume while maintaining acoustical fidelity,[11][12] Here Active Listening,[13] and Here One, a pair of wireless smart earbuds [14] that allow users to selectively filter ambient sound, stream music, and amplify speech.[15][16] Here One has been called the world’s first in-ear computer.[17][18][19]

Prior to founding Doppler Labs, Kraft was a strategic consultant for Google working for John Hanke and Niantic labs on Ingress. Kraft also worked for Lyor Cohen during the founding of 300 Entertainment

Industry honors and appearances[edit]

Kraft was the Forbes' "30 Under 30" Featured Honoree in the Consumer Technology category in 2017.[20] He was named one of Inc Magazine’s “30 Under 30 Most Brilliant Young Entrepreneurs” in 2016,[21] and as one of Fast Company’s “Most Creative People in Business” in the Tech Category in 2017.[22] He has been featured in the Wall Street Journal, the New York Times, Rolling Stone, and Wired and was profiled in Fast Company's “Doppler Labs and the Quest to Build a Computer for the Ears”.[23]

Kraft has been recognized for his product innovation by Inc Magazine’s Game Changing Inventions of 2015,[24] TIME Magazine’s Best Inventions of 2015,[25] SXSW’s "Best of Show" and "Music and Audio Innovations" Awards in 2016,[26] the Cannes Lions International Festival of Creativity Gold for Product Design in 2016[27] and through Here One's induction into the Smithsonian Institute's Cooper Hewitt Museum in New York City in 2018.

Kraft has spoken at TechCrunch Disrupt,[28] Outside Valley, the CNET and TechCrunch stages at CES 2017,[29][30] and Collision 2017.[31] He has also been featured on Bloomberg West,[32] CNN Money,[33] CNBC,[34] Fox Business [35] and CBS This Morning.[36]

Personal life[edit]

Kraft married Caroline Straty Kraft in 2014. They met in 2006 while both studying at Brown University.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Noah Kraft - CEO and Co-Founder @ Doppler Labs | crunchbase". www.crunchbase.com. Retrieved 4 October 2017.
  2. ^ Auerbach, Brad. "Doppler Labs Launches Here One: Not Only a Volume Knob in a Loud World, a Supercomputer in Every Ear". Forbes. Retrieved 4 October 2017.
  3. ^ "Noah Kraft". Forbes. Retrieved 4 October 2017.
  4. ^ Murphy, Tim. "Prick Up Your Ears". Brown Alumni Magazine. Retrieved 4 October 2017.
  5. ^ "Noah Kraft, CEO and Co-Founder, Doppler Labs". www.vbprofiles.com. Retrieved 4 October 2017.
  6. ^ "Entertainment News Alert: Verdi Productions Next Featured Film, 'BLEED FOR THIS' Heads into Pre-production - Filming to Begin in Rhode Island on November 10th". Retrieved 20 June 2014.
  7. ^ "Bleed for This". TIFF. Retrieved 4 October 2017.
  8. ^ Kenny, Glenn (17 November 2016). "Review: 'Bleed for This' Is a Boxing Movie That Gets Boxing". The New York Times. Retrieved 4 October 2017.
  9. ^ "Prism is Nicolas Jaar, Noah Kraft's block of sound". LA Times Blogs - Pop & Hiss. 26 March 2012. Retrieved 4 October 2017.
  10. ^ "SUNDAY SESSIONS Five-hour, continuous performance by Nicolas Jaar and collaborators". 5 February 2012. Retrieved 4 October 2017.
  11. ^ Aguilar, Mario. "Dubs Earplugs Don't Look Terrible So You Might Actually Wear Them". Gizmodo. Retrieved 1 December 2017.
  12. ^ Crook, Jordan. "Meet Dubs, Doppler Labs' Reinvention Of The Lowly Earplug". TechCrunch. Retrieved 1 December 2017.
  13. ^ "How To Make Coachella Even Trippier: Augmented Reality Earbuds". Fast Company. 2016-04-22. Retrieved 2017-08-17.
  14. ^ Pierce, David. "Doppler's New Earbuds Are Way More Than Just Wireless Headphones". WIRED. Retrieved 14 November 2017.
  15. ^ Dunn, Jeff. "These wireless earbuds are like mini computers for your ears that are as powerful as a 2010 laptop". Business Insider. Retrieved 14 November 2017.
  16. ^ Auerbach, Brad. "Doppler Labs Launches Here One: Not Only a Volume Knob in a Loud World, a Supercomputer in Every Ear". Forbes. Retrieved 14 November 2017.
  17. ^ Dunn, Jeff. "These wireless earbuds transform the sounds around you and preview a future of in-ear computers — here's what they're like". Business Insider. Retrieved 14 November 2017.
  18. ^ Pierce, David. "The Here One wireless earbuds let you remix reality". WIRED. Retrieved 2017-08-17.
  19. ^ "The Most Innovative Companies of 2016 by Sector: Music". Fast Company. Retrieved 2017-05-13.
  20. ^ Mac, Ryan. "Noah Kraft, 29 - pg.1". Forbes. Retrieved 4 October 2017.
  21. ^ "These Millennials Are Taking On Some of the World's Biggest Challenges". Inc.com. Retrieved October 4, 2017.
  22. ^ Pastore, Rose (24 January 2017). "Be Inspired By These Creative Leaders Who Are Changing The World". Fast Company. Retrieved 4 October 2017.
  23. ^ McCracken, Harry (21 September 2016). "Doppler Labs And The Quest To Build A Computer For Your Ears". Fast Company. Retrieved 4 October 2017.
  24. ^ "9 Game-Changing Inventions You Missed in 2015". Inc.com. 2016-01-13. Retrieved 2017-08-18.
  25. ^ Staff, TIME. "The 25 Best Inventions of 2015". Time. Retrieved 2017-08-18.
  26. ^ Hernandez, Brian Anthony. "What Has SXSW Become? Lil Wayne, Emerging Artists And Big Brands Describe The Festival's Puzzling State". Forbes. Retrieved 2017-08-18.
  27. ^ "Google Scores Product Design Grand Prix at Cannes for Jacquard 'Connected' Jacket". Retrieved 2017-08-18.
  28. ^ "Doppler Labs: Remixing Reality". YouTube. 21 September 2015. Retrieved 8 January 2018.
  29. ^ "The Here One wireless ear buds are ridiculous - Video". CNET. Retrieved 8 January 2018.
  30. ^ Crook, Jordan. "Mixed reality through audio with Noah Kraft of Doppler Labs". TechCrunch. Retrieved 8 January 2018.
  31. ^ "Collision 2017 - YouTube". YouTube. Retrieved 8 January 2018.
  32. ^ "Doppler Labs Makes Bet on the Ears With Here One". Bloomberg. Retrieved 8 January 2018.
  33. ^ "Doppler earbuds want to personalize audio". CNNMoney. Retrieved 8 January 2018.
  34. ^ "No headphone jack: sea change or stupidity?". CNBC. Retrieved 8 January 2018.
  35. ^ "Controlling your ears with new tech". Fox Business. Retrieved 29 July 2015.
  36. ^ "Startup hopes to market earbuds as hearing aid alternatives". CBS News. Retrieved 8 January 2018.