Noel Blanc

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Noel Blanc
Born
Noel Barton Blanc

(1938-10-19) October 19, 1938 (age 80)
OccupationVoice actor, radio personality
Years active1960–2005
Spouse(s)
Larraine Lax
(m. 1967; div. 1972)

Martha Smith
(m. 1977; div. 1986)

Katherine Hushaw
(m. 1998)

Noel Barton Blanc (born October 19, 1938) is an American radio personality, former voice actor and the son of late voice acting legend Mel Blanc.

Throughout Noel's childhood and early adulthood, he worked with his father on the Looney Tunes voices so that when the time came, he could take over for his father.[1] Following his father's death, Noel voiced Elmer Fudd, The Tasmanian Devil, Porky Pig and other characters in Tiny Toon Adventures and Stewie Griffin: The Untold Story. But even before then it was revealed years later by Mel Blanc himself that Noel had ghosted for him for several cartoons during his time of recovery.

Blanc also appeared in the television booth during the 2002 Chevrolet Monte Carlo 400 due to a promotion with Looney Tunes at Richmond International Raceway in 2001 and 2002. Noel did his Bugs Bunny voice, lamenting that he did not get to start the race at all.[2][better source needed] He retired from voice acting in 2005. He spends much of his time residing in his father's waterside cabin at Big Bear Lake, CA.

In 2017, Noel provided extensive, exclusive commentary concerning his famous father's career and private life for the book, Mel Blanc, the Voice of Bugs Bunny...and Me: Inside the Studio with Hollywood's Man of 1,000 Voices, published on Amazon.com. The writer, Chuck McKibben, was employed in 1972 by both men as Mel's personal recording engineer and studio operations manager of Mel Blanc Audiomedia, located in Beverly Hills, CA. Mel was the CEO and Noel the President of this "audio boutique" that specialized in developing uniquely creative radio commercials and syndicated radio programs. He won many industry awards as a producer and director, although except for McKibben's book, little has been published about this significant phase of his career.

Filmography[edit]

Television and film[edit]

Year Title Role Notes
1960 Dog Gone People Additional Voices Uncredited
1990-1992 Tiny Toon Adventures Porky Pig
The Tasmanian Devil
The Great and Powerful Principal
Additional Voices
6 Episodes
1992 The Plucky Duck Show Additional Voices
2005 Stewie Griffin: The Untold Story Elmer Fudd Direct-to-video
2006 Family Guy Elmer Fudd Episode: Stewie B. Goodie
  • General Electric Carousel of Progress - Radio Personalities[3]

Documentaries[edit]

  • This Is Your Life – Himself
  • Roger Rabbit and the Secrets of Toontown – Himself
  • 50 Years of Bugs Bunny in 31/2 Minutes – Himself
  • Happy Birthday, Bugs!: 50 Looney Years – Himself
  • What's Up Doc? A Salute to Bugs Bunny – Himself
  • Entertaining the Troops – Himself
  • Behind the Tunes – Himself
  • 100 Greatest Cartoons – Himself
  • The Chuck Woolery Show – Himself
  • Vicki! – Himself
  • Friz on Film – Himself
  • Mel Blanc: The Man of a Thousand Voices – Himself
  • King-Size Comedy: Tex Avery and the Looney Tunes Revolution – Himself
  • I Know That Voice – Himself

Theme park attractions[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Bob Bergen Official Web Site: Cool Clips". Bobbergen.com. Retrieved 2010-05-16.
  2. ^ 2002 Chevy Monte Carlo broadcast
  3. ^ Noel Blanc - IMDb

External links[edit]

Preceded by
Jeff Bergman
Voice of Porky Pig
1990
Succeeded by
Bob Bergen
Preceded by
Jeff Bergman
Voice of Tasmanian Devil
1990
Succeeded by
Maurice LaMarche
Preceded by
Greg Burson
Voice of Bugs Bunny
1992
Succeeded by
John Kassir
Preceded by
Chris Edgerly
Voice of Elmer Fudd
2005
Succeeded by
Quinton Flynn