Nomacorc

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Nomacorc is a producer of engineered synthetic corks for wine bottles.[1] Nomacorc closures use co-extruded technology [2] to manage the oxygen transfer rate (OTR) needed for wine, protecting against off-flavors in wine due to oxidation, reduction of 2,4,6-trichloroanisole (TCA) commonly known as cork taint.

History[edit]

In 1993, with more than 40 years of experience manufacturing products derived from the cellular extrusion of synthetic materials, Belgian businessman and wine connaisseur Gert Noel and his son, Marc, embarked upon “Project Broomstick” to create a wine closure based on foam extrusion technology. In 1999, they introduced the first Nomacorc closure[3]

The company is headquartered in Zebulon, North Carolina. In 2001, Nomacorc expanded into the European market with the addition of operations in Eupen, Belgium. Then, in 2003, Nomacorc moved its European headquarters to Thimister-Clermont, Belgium.[4] In January 2008, the company opened a production facility in Yantai, Shandong, China. Nomacorc has plants on three continents, which produce 2 billion corks a year.[5]

Research[edit]

In December 2008, Nomacorc announced the initiation of comprehensive, multiyear projects with the Geisenheim Wine Research Center, UC Davis Department of Viticulture and Enology, Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique (INRA), and the Australian Wine Research Institute (AWRI).

The studies focus on how oxygen transfer through closures influences the evolution of wine after bottling.[6] The studies are set for completion in December 2011.[7]

Leadership[edit]

  • Marc Noel, Founder [5]
  • Lars von Kantzow, CEO [5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ https://www.wsj.com, September 11, 2008, “Exports Prop Up Local Economies.”
  2. ^ Wine Business Monthly, April 2004, “Nomacorc expands"
  3. ^ Wine Business Monthly, April 2004, “Nomacorc expands”
  4. ^ Nomacorc, S.A. Opens State-of-the-Art Plant in Belgium | Business Wire | Find Articles at BNET
  5. ^ a b c WSJ.com, May 1, 2010. "Show Stopper: How Plastic Popped the Cork Monopoly"
  6. ^ Goode, Jamie, Ph.D. Wines & Vines (August 2008). "Finding Closure"
  7. ^ Australia Wine Business Monthly, Feb. 2009, “Nomacorc project kicks off in Chile"