Norwegian parliamentary election, 1949

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Norwegian parliamentary election, 1949
Norway
← 1945 1949 1953 →

All 150 seats in the Norwegian Parliament
76 seats were needed for a majority
  First party Second party Third party
  Einar Gerhardsen 1945.jpeg Arthur Nordlie.jpg Blank.png
Leader Einar Gerhardsen Arthur Nordlie Jacob Worm-Müller
Party Labour Conservative Liberal
Last election 76 seats, 42.5% 25 seats, 17.0% 20 seats, 13.8%
Seats won 85 23 21
Seat change Increase9 Decrease2 Increase1
Popular vote 803,471 360,961[a][b] 290,919[a][c][d]
Percentage 45.7% 20.5%[a][b] 16.5%[a][c][d]

  Fourth party Fifth party
  Einar Frogner.PNG
Leader Einar Frogner Nils Lavik
Party Farmers' Christian Democratic
Last election 10 seats, 8.0% 8 seats, 7.9%
Seats won 12 9
Seat change Increase2 Increase1
Popular vote 188,997[a][b][c] 151,402[d]
Percentage 10.8%[a][b][c] 8.1%[d]

Prime Minister before election

Einar Gerhardsen
Labour

Prime Minister-designate

Einar Gerhardsen
Labour

Parliamentary elections were held in Norway on 10 October 1949.[1] The result was a victory for the Labour Party, which won 85 of the 150 seats in the Storting.

Results[edit]

Norway 1949.png
Party Votes % Seats +/–
Labour Party 803,471 45.7 85 +9
Conservative Party 279,790 15.9 23 –2
Liberal Party 218,866 12.4 21 +1
Christian People's Party 147,068 8.4 9 +1
Communist Party 107,722 5.8 0 –11
Farmers' Party 85,418 4.9 12 +2
Farmers-Conservatives-Liberals 45,311 2.6 [a]
Farmers-Conservatives 35,860 2.0 [b]
Farmers-Liberals 22,408 1.3 [c]
Society Party 13,088 0.7 0 New
Christians-Liberals 4,334 0.2 [d]
Wild votes 30 0.0
Invalid/blank votes 12,531
Total 1,770,897 100 150 0
Registered voters/turnout 2,159,065 82.0
Source: Nohlen & Stöver

a The joint list of the Farmers' Party, Conservative Party and Liberal Party won four seats, two taken by the Conservative Party and two by the Farmers' Party.[2]

b The joint list of the Farmers' Party and Conservative Party won three seats, all taken by the Farmers' Party.[2]

c The joint list of the Farmers' Party and Liberal Party won two seats, with both parties taking one each.[2]

d The joint list of the Liberal Party and Christian People's Party won no seats.[2]


References[edit]

  1. ^ Nohlen, D & Stöver, P (2010) Elections in Europe: A data handbook, p1438 ISBN 978-3-8329-5609-7
  2. ^ a b c d Nohlen & Stöver, p1459