Nuyaka

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Coordinates: 35°39′15″N 96°08′24″W / 35.654158°N 96.139862°W / 35.654158; -96.139862 Nuyaka, Oklahoma is a populated place in Okmulgee County, Oklahoma. It is about 7.4 kilometres (4.6 mi) SSE of Beggs, Oklahoma. The elevation is 735 feet (224 m) and the coordinates are latitude 35.653 and longitude -96.14.[1] It was notable as the center of traditionalist opposition to the Creek national government during the late 19th Century. Nuyaka Mission was located nearby.

According to one source, the name Nuyaka is from the Creek pronunciation for New York, which was the site of a meeting between President George Washington and 26 Creek chiefs. The meeting was to discuss a treaty and to obtain a cession of Creek land to the U, S. Government. Reportedly, the Creeks were so impressed with New York City that they named one of their towns in present-day Alabama on the Tallapoosa River for it.[2] The town was abandoned during the Creek War in the fall of 1813 and destroyed by Major General David Adams in December 1813. That site was never rebuilt and is now within the boundary of the Horseshoe Bend National Military Park. [3] White men wrote the town name as Nuyaka.[4]

After the Muscogee (Creek) Nation moved to Indian Territory, the name was given to one of the new Creek towns near Okmulgee. This Nuyaka was populated mainly by full-blood Creeks who did not want to adopt the ways of white civilization. After the Civil War, it became the center of a threatened insurrection by a group of full-blood Creeks against the officially recognized Creek Nation government and the ruling faction, led by Samuel Checote. The dissidents were led by Lochar Harjo and, after Harjo's death, Isparhecher. The rebellion over various issues, such as retention of tribal culture as a way of life and tribal ownership of land, was settled with little bloodshed, though it was called the Green Peach War.[4]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ OK HomeTownLocator, Nuyaka Populated Place Profile. Retrieved April 28, 2013.[1]
  2. ^ Piker, Joshua Aaron. Okfuskee: A Creek Indian Town in Colonial America. Available on Google Books. p. 198. Retrieved June 27, 2013.[2]
  3. ^ "The Creek War and the War of 1812:Nuyaka."
  4. ^ a b Federal Writers Project of the Works Progress Administration. Oklahoma: A Guide to the Sooner State. (1941) University of Oklahoma. Available on line from Google Books. [3]