Horseshoe Bend National Military Park

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Horseshoe Bend National Military Park
Horseshoe Bend National Military Park, Tallapoosa County, Alabama.jpg
Map showing the location of Horseshoe Bend National Military Park
Map showing the location of Horseshoe Bend National Military Park
Map showing the location of Horseshoe Bend National Military Park
Map showing the location of Horseshoe Bend National Military Park
LocationTallapoosa County, Alabama, USA
Nearest cityAlexander City, Alabama
Coordinates32°58′15″N 85°44′18″W / 32.97083°N 85.73833°W / 32.97083; -85.73833Coordinates: 32°58′15″N 85°44′18″W / 32.97083°N 85.73833°W / 32.97083; -85.73833
Area2,040 acres (8.3 km2)[1]
EstablishedJuly 25, 1956[2]
Visitors28,600 (in 2020)[3]
Governing bodyNational Park Service
WebsiteHorseshoe Bend National Historic Park
Horseshoe Bend National Military Park
Built1813
NRHP reference No.66000060[4]
Added to NRHPOctober 15, 1966

Horseshoe Bend National Military Park is a 2,040-acre, U.S. national military park managed by the National Park Service that is the site of the last battle of the Creek War on March 27, 1814. General Andrew Jackson's Tennessee militia, aided by the 39th U.S. Infantry Regiment and Cherokee and Lower Creek allies, won a decisive victory against the Upper Creek Red Stick Nation during the Battle of Horseshoe Bend at this site on the Tallapoosa River. Jackson's decisive victory at Horseshoe Bend broke the power of the Creek Nation.[5]

Over 800 Upper Creeks died defending their homeland. This was the largest loss of life for Native Americans in a single battle in the history of United States.[6]

On August 9, 1814, the Creeks signed the Treaty of Fort Jackson, which ceded 23 million acres (93,000 km2) of land in Alabama and Georgia to the United States government.

Map of Horseshoe Bend

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Listing of acreage as of December 31, 2020" (PDF). Land Resource Division, National Park Service. Retrieved August 15, 2021.
  2. ^ "Park Anniversaries". Retrieved August 13, 2021.
  3. ^ "Annual Park Recreation Visits (1960-Last Calendar Year)". nps.gov. National Park Service.
  4. ^ "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. July 9, 2010.
  5. ^ Scott, David (2004). Guide to the National Park Areas Eastern States. Guilford, Conn: Globe Pequot Press. p. 1. ISBN 0-7627-2988-0. OCLC 55075855.
  6. ^ "Horseshoe Bend National Military Park". National Park Service. Retrieved March 1, 2008.

External links[edit]