Oroville-Osoyoos Border Crossing

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Oroville-Osoyoos Border Crossing
Osoyoos bc border station 1997.jpg
The Canadian inspection station at Osoyoos, BC as seen in 1997
Location
CountryUnited States; Canada
Location
Coordinates49°00′00″N 119°27′42″W / 49.000084°N 119.461757°W / 49.000084; -119.461757Coordinates: 49°00′00″N 119°27′42″W / 49.000084°N 119.461757°W / 49.000084; -119.461757
Details
Opened1861
US Phone(509) 476-2955
Canadian Phone(250) 495-6531
HoursOpen 24 hours
Website
https://www.cbp.gov/contact/ports/oroville-wa-washington-3019#

The Oroville-Osoyoos Border Crossing connects the cities of Oroville, Washington and Osoyoos, British Columbia on the Canada–US border. It can be reached by U.S. Route 97 on the American side and British Columbia Highway 97 on the Canadian side. This crossing was among the first on the border to have border inspection services. Canada first established a Customs office in Osoyoos in 1861. Today it is a busy 24-hour crossing that features a large joint border station that houses both the US and Canada border inspection services.

History[edit]

The original Canada border inspection station was situated near the north end of Osoyoos lake in 1861. This location was not very effective, so the building was physically moved into the village of Osoyoos in 1865. The building burned down in 1878, so the Customs officer operated out of his home until his death in 1888.[1] A border station was constructed at the US border in the early 1900s, and was rebuilt around 1930. Finally a brick facility was built around 1952 which remained in use until the joint border station was built in 2003.

The US operated a Customs office in the village of Oroville until 1933, when it built an inspection station and officer housing at the border. This building remained in use until the joint border station was completed in 2003.

Gallery[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Kruger, Chrestenza (1935). "Early Days at Osoyoos". The Sixth Report of the Okanagan Historical Society: 76.