Otto Zdansky

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Otto Karl Josef Zdansky[1] (28 November 1894, Vienna – 26 December 1988, Uppsala) was an Austrian paleontologist.

Biography[edit]

He graduated from the Philosophical School at the University of Vienna in Paleontology on March 21, 1921 with the academic degree 'Dr. phil.' (dissertation: 'Über die Temporalregion des Schildkrötenschädels').[1]

He is best known for his work in China, where he, as an assistant to Johan Gunnar Andersson, discovered a fossil tooth of the Peking Man in 1921 at the Dragon Bone Hill, although he did not disclose it until 1926 [2] when he published it in Nature after an analysis by Davidson Black.[3] He is also famous for his excavations of mammal fossils in Baode County area (Pao Te Hsien), Shanxi Province.[4] Zdansky in 1923 excavated the sauropod dinosaur Euhelopus zdanskyi named after him.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Katharina Kniefacz Otto Karl Josef Zdansky // Memorial Book of National Socialism at the University of Vienna
  2. ^ "Morgan Lucas" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on May 4, 2006. 
  3. ^ https://www.academia.edu/11440224/L_Homme_de_P%C3%A9kin_Otto_Zdansky_-_Etude_de_lusure_des_dents%20
  4. ^ "Hipparion Clay". 

Further reading[edit]