PRAME

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Preferentially expressed antigen in melanoma
Identifiers
Symbols PRAME ; CT130; MAPE; OIP-4; OIP4
External IDs OMIM606021 HomoloGene48404 GeneCards: PRAME Gene
RNA expression pattern
PBB GE PRAME 204086 at tn.png
More reference expression data
Orthologs
Species Human Mouse
Entrez 23532 n/a
Ensembl ENSG00000185686 n/a
UniProt P78395 n/a
RefSeq (mRNA) NM_001291715 n/a
RefSeq (protein) NP_001278644 n/a
Location (UCSC) Chr 22:
22.89 – 22.9 Mb
n/a
PubMed search [1] n/a

Melanoma antigen preferentially expressed in tumors is a protein that in humans is encoded by the PRAME gene.[1][2][3]

This gene encodes an antigen that is predominantly expressed in human melanomas and that is recognized by cytolytic T lymphocytes. It is not expressed in normal tissues, except testis. This expression pattern is similar to that of other CT antigens, such as MAGE, BAGE and GAGE. However, unlike these other CT antigens, this gene is also expressed in acute leukemias. Five alternatively spliced transcript variants encoding the same protein have been observed for this gene.[3]

Model organisms[edit]

Model organisms have been used in the study of PRAME function. A conditional knockout mouse line called Prametm1a(KOMP)Wtsi was generated at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute.[4] Male and female animals underwent a standardized phenotypic screen[5] to determine the effects of deletion.[6][7][8][9] Additional screens performed: - In-depth immunological phenotyping[10]



References[edit]

  1. ^ Ikeda H, Lethe B, Lehmann F, van Baren N, Baurain JF, de Smet C, Chambost H, Vitale M, Moretta A, Boon T, Coulie PG (Mar 1997). "Characterization of an antigen that is recognized on a melanoma showing partial HLA loss by CTL expressing an NK inhibitory receptor". Immunity 6 (2): 199–208. doi:10.1016/S1074-7613(00)80426-4. PMID 9047241. 
  2. ^ Dunham I, Shimizu N, Roe BA, Chissoe S, Hunt AR, Collins JE, Bruskiewich R, Beare DM, Clamp M, Smink LJ, Ainscough R, Almeida JP, Babbage A, Bagguley C, Bailey J, Barlow K, Bates KN, Beasley O, Bird CP, Blakey S, Bridgeman AM, Buck D, Burgess J, Burrill WD, O'Brien KP et al. (Dec 1999). "The DNA sequence of human chromosome 22". Nature 402 (6761): 489–95. doi:10.1038/990031. PMID 10591208. 
  3. ^ a b "Entrez Gene: PRAME preferentially expressed antigen in melanoma". 
  4. ^ Gerdin AK (2010). "The Sanger Mouse Genetics Programme: high throughput characterisation of knockout mice". Acta Opthalmologica 88: 925-7.doi:10.1111/j.1755-3768.2010.4142.x: Wiley. 
  5. ^ a b "International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium". 
  6. ^ Skarnes WC, Rosen B, West AP, Koutsourakis M, Bushell W, Iyer V et al. (Jun 2011). "A conditional knockout resource for the genome-wide study of mouse gene function". Nature 474 (7351): 337–42. doi:10.1038/nature10163. PMC 3572410. PMID 21677750. 
  7. ^ Dolgin E (Jun 2011). "Mouse library set to be knockout". Nature 474 (7351): 262–3. doi:10.1038/474262a. PMID 21677718. 
  8. ^ Collins FS, Rossant J, Wurst W (Jan 2007). "A mouse for all reasons". Cell 128 (1): 9–13. doi:10.1016/j.cell.2006.12.018. PMID 17218247. 
  9. ^ White JK, Gerdin AK, Karp NA, Ryder E, Buljan M, Bussell JN et al. (2013). "Genome-wide generation and systematic phenotyping of knockout mice reveals new roles for many genes". Cell 154 (2): 452–64. doi:10.1016/j.cell.2013.06.022. PMID 23870131. 
  10. ^ a b "Infection and Immunity Immunophenotyping (3i) Consortium". 

Further reading[edit]