Pantarchy

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Pantarchy is a social theory proposed by Stephen Pearl Andrews in the 19th century. Andrews was considered the "American rival of Comte," because of his work on an all-encompassing philosophy of universology, and his political proposals had similar scope, combining elements of the individualist anarchism of Josiah Warren, whose works Andrews had edited, with a strong belief in natural hierarchy.[1]

The plan of this party proposes a NEW SPIRITUAL GOVERNMENT FOR THE WORLD, called THE PANTARCHY, which includes a NEW CHURCH and a NEW STATE, with, to use his own language, " all other subordinate institutions, educational, informational, &c., which are universal in their scope and nature, and which can be devised and established as subservient to the collective wants of mankind." [2]

Andrews scheme of pantarchy was discussed in a series of "Weekly Bulletins" in the pages of Woodhull and Claflin's Weekly. The American Section 12 of the International Workingmen's Association adopted some of Andrews' proposals.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Daniel Dorchester. Christianity in the United States. Cincinnati: Phillips and Hunt, 1888. 834; Stephen Pearl Andrews. Constitution or Organic Basis of the Pantarchy. New York: Baker and Godwin, 1860.
  2. ^ Daniel Dorchester. Christianity in the United States. Cincinnati: Phillips and Hunt, 1888. 834.