Patrick Rabbitt

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Professor

Patrick Rabbitt
Born
Patrick Michael Anthony Rabbitt

(1934-09-23) 23 September 1934 (age 84)
NationalityEnglish
OccupationPsychologist

Patrick Michael Anthony Rabbitt (born 1934), also known as Pat, is an English psychologist who has specialised in researching the mental effects of aging — cognitive gerontology.[1]

Rabbitt was born on 23 September 1934, to Edna Maude, née Smith, and Joseph Bernard Rabbitt, and educated at Queens' College, Cambridge.[2]

He worked as a research student at the University of Cambridge, under Donald Broadbent, and in 1961 moved to the Applied Psychology Unit, where he undertook projects at the behest of the General Post Office.[3]

He subsequently worked for the University of Oxford as a lecturer in psychology (1968-1982); the University of Durham as Professor of Psychology and head of department in (1982-1983); and the University of Manchester, in the Research Chair in Gerontology and Cognitive Psychology and Director of the Age and Cognitive Performance Research Centre (1983-2004).[2][3]

He subsequently took up a position at the Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford.[2]

Rabbitt is married to Dorothy Bishop, also a noted psychologist.[2]

The 2012 book, Measuring the mind speed, control, and age is dedicated to him.[4][5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Pat Rabbitt -- Cognition, sex and very mild discontent in old age, Goldsmiths, University of London, 2014
  2. ^ a b c d "RABBITT, Prof. Patrick Michael Anthony". Who's Who 2014, A & C Black, an imprint of Bloomsbury Publishing plc, 2014; online edn, Oxford University Press.(subscription required)
  3. ^ a b Lois Reynolds; Tilli Tansey, eds. (2003), The MRC Applied Psychology Unit, Wellcome Witnesses to Contemporary Medicine, History of Modern Biomedicine Research Group, ISBN 978-0-85484-088-5Wikidata Q29581668
  4. ^ J., Duncan; L., Phillips; P., McLeod (2012). Measuring the mind speed, control, and age.
  5. ^ "Measuring the mind speed, control, and age". University of Oxford. 22 March 2012. Retrieved 19 June 2017.

External links[edit]