Paul Dibble

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Paul Dibble

Born
Paul Hugh Dibble

(1943-03-20) 20 March 1943 (age 77)
Thames, New Zealand
Alma materElam School of Fine Arts
Known forSculpture
Notable work
New Zealand War Memorial, London
Spouse(s)1. Patricia Burke (d. 1983)
2.
(
m. 1985)

Paul Hugh Dibble MNZM (born 20 March 1943) is a New Zealand sculptor.

Biography[edit]

Born in Thames on 20 March 1943 and raised on a farm in Waitakaruru on tha Hauraki Plains,[1] Dibble was educated at Thames High School. He trained at the Elam School of Fine Arts, University of Auckland from 1963, graduating with a Diploma of Fine Arts with Honours in 1967.[2]

Dibble was appointed to lecture painting and sculpture at the Palmerston North College of Education in 1977.[2] Between 1997 and 2002 he lectured in art at Massey University.[3] He has produced a wide range of pieces and has mounted many one-man exhibitions beginning with the Barry Lett Gallery in Auckland in 1971.[3] In 2000 he established his own bronze foundry for larger works, and is one of a small number of New Zealand sculptors who does his own large-scale casting.[4]

Ghost of the Huia

He received grants from the QEII Arts Council in 1979 and 1985, and held a residency at the Dowse Art Museum in Lower Hutt in 1987–88.[3] Dibble was appointed a Member of the New Zealand Order of Merit for services to the arts in the 2005 New Year Honours,[5] and in 2007 he was awarded an honorary Doctor of Fine Arts degree by Massey University.[6]

Dibble's work is held in public collections in New Zealand, including that of the Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa,[7] the Dowse Art Museum, Te Manawa in Palmerston North, and the Christchurch Art Gallery.[3]

In 2016, the Stuart Residence Halls Council gifted Dibble's sculpture Pathways to the University of Otago, to celebrate the council's 75th anniversary.[8]

In May 2018 Dibble's sculpture The Garden 2002 was unveiled in Havelock North by Governor-General Dame Patsy Reddy.[9]

Notable commissions[edit]

Gallery[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • Dibble, Fran; Dibble, Paul (2012). Paul Dibble: The Large Works. New Zealand: David Bateman. ISBN 9781869538194.
  • Cook, Jeanette (2006). Paul Dibble. New Zealand: David Bateman. ISBN 9781869536527.
  • Cook, Jeanette (2001). Paul Dibble. New Zealand: David Bateman. ISBN 1869535073.
  • "An Interview with Sculptor Paul Dibble". tvnz.co.nz. Television New Zealand. 2012.
  • "Paul Dibble: The Large Works – review". New Zealand Listener. 2012.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Paul Dibble". Milford Galleries. Retrieved 11 August 2018.
  2. ^ a b Taylor, Alister, ed. (2001). New Zealand Who's Who Aotearoa 2001. Auckland: Alister Taylor Publishers. ISSN 1172-9813.
  3. ^ a b c d "Paul Dibble" (PDF). Gow Langsford Gallery. 2014. Retrieved 29 November 2015.
  4. ^ "Paul Dibble at the Gow Langsford Gallery". gowlangsfordgallery.co.nz. 2015. Retrieved 29 November 2015.
  5. ^ "New Year honours list 2005". Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet. 31 December 2004. Retrieved 29 November 2015.
  6. ^ "Honorary graduates". Massey University. Archived from the original on 25 April 2018. Retrieved 29 November 2015.
  7. ^ "Dibble, Paul at Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa". collections.tepapa.govt.nz. 2012. Retrieved 3 March 2012.
  8. ^ "Major artwork unveiled". University of Otago. Retrieved 11 August 2018.
  9. ^ Harfield, Ruby (4 May 2018). "Havelock North sculpture unveiled by Governor-General". New Zealand Herald. Retrieved 5 April 2020.