1-Aminopentane

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1-Aminopentane
Skeletal formula of pentylamine
Names
Preferred IUPAC name
Pentan-1-amine
Other names
Pentylamine
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
505953
ChEBI
ChemSpider
DrugBank
ECHA InfoCard 100.003.438
EC Number
  • 203-780-2
MeSH n-amylamine
RTECS number
  • SC0300000
UN number 1106
Properties
C5H13N
Molar mass 87.166 g·mol−1
Appearance Colourless liquid
Density 0.752 g mL−1
Melting point −55 °C; −67 °F; 218 K
Boiling point 94 to 110 °C; 201 to 230 °F; 367 to 383 K
Miscible
410 μmol Pa−1 kg−1
-69.4·10−6 cm3/mol
1.411
Thermochemistry
218 J K−1 mol−1 (at −75 °C)
Hazards
GHS pictograms GHS02: Flammable GHS05: Corrosive GHS06: Toxic
GHS Signal word Danger
H225, H302, H312, H314, H331
P210, P261, P280, P305+351+338, P310
Flash point 1 °C (34 °F; 274 K)
Explosive limits 2.2–22%
Lethal dose or concentration (LD, LC):
  • 470 mg kg−1 (oral, rat)
  • 1.12 g kg−1 (dermal, rabbit)
Related compounds
Related alkanamines
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
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Infobox references

1-Aminopentane is an organic compound with the formula CH3(CH2)4NH2. It is used as a solvent, as a raw material in the manufacture of a variety of other compounds, including dyes, emulsifiers, and pharmaceutical products,[1] and as a flavoring agent.[2][3]

Pentylamine exhibits reactions typical of other simple alkyl amines, i.e. protonation, alkylation, acylation, condensation with carbonyls. Like other simple aliphatic amines, pentylamine is a weak base: the pKa of [CH3(CH2)4NH3]+ is 10.21.[4]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Flick, Ernest W. (1998). Industrial Solvents Handbook (5th ed.). Park Ridge, NJ: William Andrew. p. 695. ISBN 0-8155-1413-1.
  2. ^ "JECFA Evaluations-PENTYLAMINE. Summary of Evaluations Performed by the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives" (January 31, 2006). Retrieved on 2008-07-25
  3. ^ Karsten Eller, Erhard Henkes, Roland Rossbacher, Hartmut Höke, "Amines, Aliphatic" Ullmann's Encyclopedia of Industrial Chemistry, Wiley-VCH, Weinheim, 2005.doi:10.1002/14356007.a02_001
  4. ^ H. K. Hall, Jr. (1957). "Correlation of the Base Strengths of Amines". J. Am. Chem. Soc. 79: 5441–5444. doi:10.1021/ja01577a030.