Penygroes, Pembrokeshire

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Penygroes
Penygroes Chapel - geograph.org.uk - 647659.jpg
Penygroes Chapel
Penygroes is located in Pembrokeshire
Penygroes
Penygroes
Location within Pembrokeshire
OS grid referenceSN1535
Community
  • Crymych
Principal area
CountryWales
Sovereign stateUnited Kingdom
Postcode districtSA41
Dialling code01239
PoliceDyfed-Powys
FireMid and West Wales
AmbulanceWelsh
EU ParliamentWales
UK Parliament
  • Preseli Pembrokeshire
Welsh Assembly
  • Preseli Pembrokeshire
List of places
UK
Wales
Pembrokeshire
51°59′10″N 4°41′17″W / 51.986°N 4.688°W / 51.986; -4.688Coordinates: 51°59′10″N 4°41′17″W / 51.986°N 4.688°W / 51.986; -4.688

Penygroes (About this soundWelsh pronunciation) is a scattered rural hamlet in north Pembrokeshire, Wales, in the northern foothills of the Preseli Mountains. It is in the parish of Eglwyswen, the community of Crymych and the Pembrokeshire Coast National Park.

Description[edit]

Penygroes is a scattered hamlet at about 150 metres (490 ft) in elevation, with a few dwellings and farms, in a broad valley under the northern edge of the Preseli Mountains.

Agriculture[edit]

In the west of the hamlet, on the parish boundary with Meline, was a woollen factory close to the brook known as Afon Clun-maen which rises in the mountains and flows northwards past a farm now known as Glynmaen.[1] At one time it would have been active at shearing time for the sheep that have been grazed on the unenclosed moorland to the south for centuries.

Chapel[edit]

The congregation, established before 1800,[2] is in the Union of Welsh Independent churches. An 1871 history of the Welsh independent churches puts the date of the foundation of the congregation in Penygroes at 1765, but the chapel was not built until 1828; prior to that, worship took place at Cilcam. The history lists the preachers, in a few cases in some detail.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "GENUKI: Parish map (No.17)". Retrieved 13 May 2015.
  2. ^ "GENUKI: Eglwyswen". Retrieved 13 May 2015.
  3. ^ Rees, T. and Thomas, J. (1871). Hanes Eglwysi Annibynnol Cymru (with English translation). Retrieved 13 May 2015.CS1 maint: Multiple names: authors list (link)