Pete Yellin

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Pete Yellin
Birth name Peter Michael Yellin
Born (1941-07-18)July 18, 1941
New York City, U.S.
Died April 13, 2016(2016-04-13) (aged 74)
Berkeley, California
Genres Jazz, big band
Occupation(s) Musician, educator
Instruments Saxophone
Years active 1960–2007
Labels Mainstream
Associated acts Buddy Rich, Bob Mintzer
Website www.peteyellin.net

Peter Michael Yellin (July 18, 1941 – April 13, 2016) was an American jazz saxophonist and educator.

Career[edit]

A native of New York City, Yellin received piano lessons from his father, who was a staff pianist for NBC. He began playing saxophone in the late 1950s after hearing Art Pepper. He studied music at the Juilliard School and Brooklyn College.[1]

During the 1960s, Yellin worked with Chick Corea, Lionel Hampton, Buddy Rich, and Tito Puente. In the 1970s, he was a member of Joe Henderson's band and worked with Mario Bauzá, Charles Earland, Maynard Ferguson, Sam Jones, and the Thad Jones/Mel Lewis Orchestra. He started his own group in 1974. During the 1980s and 1990s, he worked with George Benson, Eddie Palmieri, and Bob Mintzer. Yellin played with Mintzer's big band from its origin in 1984 until 2007, when he moved to California.[1][2]

Four years later, he suffered the first of several strokes that would end his life in 2016.[1] He taught jazz at Long Island University, establishing its program in 1984 and leading it through the 1990s.[1][2]

Discography[edit]

  • Dance of Allegra (Mainstream, 1973)
  • It's the Right Thing (Mainstream, 1973)
  • European Connection: Live! (Jazz4Ever, 1995)
  • It's You or No One (Mons, 1996)
  • Mellow Soul (Metropolitan, 1999)[3]
  • How Long Has This Been Going On? (Jazzed Media, 2009)[4]

With Sam Jones

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Reed, Bobby (20 April 2016). "Saxophonist & Jazz Educator Pete Yellin Dies at 74". DownBeat. Retrieved 3 June 2017. 
  2. ^ a b "Saxophonist and Educator Pete Yellin Dies at 74". JazzTimes. 22 April 2016. Retrieved 3 June 2017. 
  3. ^ Bowers, Jack (1 March 1999). "Pete Yellin: Mellow Soul". All About Jazz. Retrieved 3 June 2017. 
  4. ^ Deshpande, Jay (10 February 2009). "Peter Yellin: How Long Has This Been Going On?". All About Jazz. Retrieved 3 June 2017.