Peter Norburn

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Peter Norburn
Personal information
Born (1930-12-31) 31 December 1930 (age 86)
Wigan, Lancashire, England
Playing information
Position Wing, Second-row
Club
Years Team Pld T G FG P
≤1953–≥64 Swinton
Representative
Years Team Pld T G FG P
1958 English League XIII 1
1953 England 1 4 0 0 12

Peter Norburn (born (1930-12-31) 31 December 1930 (age 86) in Wigan, Lancashire[1]) is an English professional rugby league footballer of the 1950s, and 1960s, playing at representative level for England and English League XIII, and at club level for Swinton, as a Wing, or Second-row, i.e. number 2 or 5, or, 11 or 12.

Playing career[edit]

International honours[edit]

Peter Norburn played Right-Second-row, i.e. number 12 for English League XIII while at Swinton in the 19-8 victory over France at Headingley, Leeds on Wednesday 16 April 1958, and won a cap playing Right-Wing, i.e. number 2, and scored 3 (4?)-tries for England while at Swinton in the 30-22 victory over Other Nationalities at Central Park, Wigan on Saturday 28 November 1953.[2]

Norburn equalled the England national team's record for most tries by an individual in a match when he scored four against Other Nationalities at Central Park, Wigan on 28 November 1953.

County Cup Final appearances[edit]

Peter Norburn played Right-Second-row, i.e. number 12, in Swinton's 9-15 defeat by St. Helens in the 1960 Lancashire County Cup Final during the 1960–61 season at Central Park, Wigan on Saturday 29 October 1960, played Right-Second-row in the 9-25 defeat by St. Helens in the 1961 Lancashire County Cup Final during the 1961–62 season at Central Park, Wigan on Saturday 11 November 1961, and played Left-Second-row, i.e. number 11, in 4-7 defeat by St. Helens in the 1962 Lancashire County Cup Final during the 1962–63 season at Central Park, Wigan on Saturday 27 October 1962.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Birth details at freebmd.org.uk". freebmd.org.uk. 31 December 2011. Retrieved 1 January 2012. 
  2. ^ "England Statistics at englandrl.co.uk". englandrl. 31 December 2011. Retrieved 1 January 2012. 

External links[edit]