Pitcairn's Island (novel)

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Pitcairn's Island
PitcairnsIsland.jpg
First edition cover
Author Charles Nordhoff and James Norman Hall
Country United States
Language English
Series The Bounty Trilogy
Genre Historical fiction
Publisher Little, Brown and Company
Publication date
1934
Media type Print (Hardcover and Paperback)
Preceded by 'Mutiny on the Bounty and Men Against the Sea'

Pitcairn's Island is the third installment in the fictional trilogy by Charles Nordhoff and James Norman Hall about the mutiny aboard the HMS Bounty. It is preceded by Mutiny on the "Bounty" and Men Against the Sea. The novel first appeared in The Saturday Evening Post (from September 22, 1934 through November 3, 1934) then was published in 1934 by Little, Brown and Company. Chapters I-XV are told in the third person, and Chapters XVI-XXI are told in the first person by John Adams. The epilogue that follows is in the third person.

Synopsis[edit]

After two unsuccessful attempts to settle on the island of Tubuai, the Bounty mutineers returned to Tahiti where they parted company. Fletcher Christian and eight of his men, together with eighteen Polynesians, sailed from Tahiti in September 1789, and for a period of eighteen years nothing was heard of them. Then, in 1808, the American sailing vessel Topaz discovered a thriving community of mixed blood on Pitcairn Island under the rule of "Alexander Smith" (the assumed name of John Adams, the only survivor of the fifteen men who had landed there so long before).

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