Guinusia chabrus

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Guinusia chabrus
Red rock crab, Plagusia chabrus.jpg
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Arthropoda
Subphylum: Crustacea
Class: Malacostraca
Order: Decapoda
Infraorder: Brachyura
Family: Plagusiidae
Genus: Guinusia
Species: G. chabrus
Binomial name
Guinusia chabrus[1]
(Linnaeus, 1758[2]
Synonyms
  • Cancer chabrus Linnaeus, 1758
  • Cancer velutinus Linnaeus, 1764
  • Grapsus capensis De Haan, 1835
  • Plagusia capensis (De Haan, 1835)
  • Plagusia chabrus (Linnaeus, 1758)
  • Plagusia tomentosus H. Milne-Edwards, 1837
  • Plagusia spinosa MacLeay, 1838
  • Plagusia gaimardi H. Milne-Edwards, 1853

The red rock crab, Guinusia chabrus, is a marine large-eyed crab of the family Plagusiidae.[2] It is found in the southern Indian and southern Pacific Oceans, including South Africa, Australia, New Zealand, and Chile.[3]

Description[edit]

A sturdy square bodied crab with a smooth dark red-brown carapace and yellow longitudinal ridges on the legs, yellow knobs on the pincers. There may be four white spots on the carapace in a roughly semicircular pattern.[4]

Distribution[edit]

Southern Africa: Luderitz to Sodwana Bay, Subtidal to at least 100m.[4]

Ecology[edit]

Common on reefs. Often seen in crevices or hiding under other benthic organisms. Scavenger.[4]

With Haliotis midae it makes up the favoured diet of Octopus vulgaris in False Bay, South Africa.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Peter Davie (2012). "Guinusia chabrus (Linnaeus, 1758)". World Register of Marine Species. Retrieved December 11, 2012. 
  2. ^ a b Peter K. L. Ng, Danièle Guinot & Peter J. F. Davie (2008). "Systema Brachyurorum: Part I. An annotated checklist of extant Brachyuran crabs of the world" (PDF). Raffles Bulletin of Zoology. 17: 1–286. 
  3. ^ "Plagusia chabrus, red rock crab, (Plagusia capensis)". SeaFriends. Retrieved June 5, 2009. 
  4. ^ a b c Jones, Georgina. A field guide to the marine animals of the Cape Peninsula. SURG, Cape Town, 2008. ISBN 978-0-620-41639-9
  5. ^ C. D. Smith (2003). "Diet of Octopus vulgaris in False Bay, South Africa". Marine Biology. 143 (6): 1127–1133. doi:10.1007/s00227-003-1144-2. 

External links[edit]