Plasmodium minasense

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Plasmodium minasense is a parasite of the genus Plasmodium subgenus Carinamoeba.

Like all Plasmodium species P. minasense has both vertebrate and insect hosts. The vertebrate hosts for this parasite are lizards.

Plasmodium minasense
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Protista
Phylum: Apicomplexa
Class: Aconoidasida
Order: Haemosporida
Family: Plasmodiidae
Genus: Plasmodium
Species: P. minasense
Binomial name
Plasmodium minasense

Description[edit]

The original description of this species was by Carini and Rudolphi in 1912[1] in a lizard Mabuia agilis. Since then a number of subspecies of P. minasense have been described.

The diagnostic features of P. minasense are:

It is currently thought that P. minasense is closely related to Plasmodium floridense and Plasmodium tropiduri. Like much of the taxonomy in this genus this opinion may need to be revised once the species have been subjected to DNA analysis.

Subspecies are currently named on the basis of the hosts infected. This criterion may be subject to revision when DNA based taxonomy is applied to this species complex. The subspecies currently recognised include:

P. minasense anolisi
P. minasense calcaratae
P. minasense capitoi
P. minasense carinii
P. minasense diminutivum
P. minasense minasense
P. minasense plicae
P. minasense tegui

P. minasense anolisi[edit]

Described by Telford in 1979 [2]

Geographical occurrence:

Found in Panama, Central America and the Caribbean.

Clinical features and host pathology:

Known hosts include the lizards Anolis cybotes, Anolis distichus, Anolis frenatus and Anolis limifrons

P. minasense calcaratae[edit]

This subspecies was described by Telford and Telford in 2003.[3]

It is characterized by very small, usually fan-shaped, schizonts that average 3.4 × 2.6 micrometres (range: 2.5 – 4.5 × 2.0 – 3.0). The schizonts produce 3.9 (range: 3 – 4) merozoites.

The gametocytes are spherical or ovoid averaging 6.7 × 5.0 micrometres (range: 4.5 – 9.0 × 3.0 – 7.0) in size with a length-width product of 33.7 (range: 15 – 54) and a length/width ratio of 1.4 (range: 1.0 – 2.3). By dimension they are not sexual dimorphic.

Geographical occurrence:

Found in Venezuela, South America.

Clinical features and host pathology:

The only known host is the lizard Kentropyx calcarata

P. minasense capitoi[edit]

This species was described by Telford in 1979.[2]

Geographical occurrence:

Found in Panama, Central America.

Clinical features and host pathology:

The only known host is the lizard Anolis capito

P. minasense carinii[edit]

This species was described by Leger and Mouzels in 1917

Geographical occurrence:

Found in coastal South America.

Clinical features and host pathology:

The only known host is the lizard Iguana iguana

P. minasense diminutivum[edit]

This species was described by Telford in 1973

Geographical occurrence:

Found in Panama, Central America.

Clinical features and host pathology:

The only known host is the lizard Ameiva ameiva

P. minasense minasense[edit]

This is recognised as the type species. It was described by Carini and Rudolphi[1] in 1912 in a lizard Mabuya agilis.

Geographical occurrence:

Found in Brazil, Central America.

Clinical features and host pathology:

Known hosts include the lizards Mabuya agilis and Mabuya mabouya.

P. minasense plicae[edit]

This species was described by Telford in 1979.[2]

Geographical occurrence:

Found in Guyana, South America.

Clinical features and host pathology:

The only known host is the lizard Plica umbra

P. minasense tegui[edit]

Geographical occurrence:

Found in Venezuela, South America.

Clinical features and host pathology:

The only known host is the lizard Tupinambis teguixin

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Carini, A. y Rudoph, M. (1912) Sur quelques hematozoaires de Lézards au Brésil. Bull. Soc. Path. exot. 5: 592.
  2. ^ a b c Telford SR Jr.(1979) A taxonomic revision of small neotropical saurian Malarias allied to Plasmodium minasense. Ann. Parasitol. Hum. Comp. 54(4):409-422.
  3. ^ Telford S. R. Jr. and Telford S.R. III (2003) Rediscovery and redescription of Plasmodium pifanoi and description of two additional Plasmodium parasites of Venezuelan lizards. J. Parasitol. 89(2) 362–368