Promavia Jet Squalus

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F.1300 Jet Squalus
Promavia F.1300 Jet Squalus Farnborough 10.09.88R.jpg
The prototype Promavia Jet Squalus exhibited at the Farnborough Air Show in September 1988
Role Jet Trainer
National origin Belgium
Manufacturer Promavia
Designer Stelio Frati
First flight 30 April 1987
Number built 1

The Promavia F.1300 Jet Squalus, also known as Promavia Jet Squalus F1300, was a two-seat light jet trainer designed by Italian Stelio Frati and built by Promavia in Belgium with support from the Belgian government.

Development[edit]

The Jet Squalus was designed by Frati and based on his earlier lightweight jet trainers the F.5 Trento and the F.400 Cobra. It was a low-wing cantilever monoplane with retractable landing gear. The Jet Squalus was powered by a Garrett TFE109 turbofan with engine intakes in above the wing root. The prototype, registered I-SQAL, first flew on 30 April 1987.[1] The aircraft was fitted with four underwing hard points for disposable stores to allow weapons training.

Operational history[edit]

With the demise of the similar American Fairchild T-46 trainer in 1986 the support for the engine disappeared and it was planned to re-engine with the Williams-Rolls FJ44. The aircraft was exhibited at the Farnborough Air Show in September 1988, but the project folded and Promavia went bankrupt in 1998. An unflown second prototype was to be modified for airline pilot training, and the unfinished third prototype was to be pressurised.

Variants[edit]

F1300 NGT
The baseline jet trainer version of the Procaer Cobra lineage.[2]
F1300 AWS-MS/SAR
Proposed Maritime surveillance/search and rescue.[2]
F1300 AWS-R
Proposed Reconnaissance.[2]
F1300 AWS-W
Proposed Armament trainer or Police/Border defence.[2]
F1300 AWS-TT
Proposed Target tower.[2]

Specifications[edit]

Data from Jane's All The World's Aircraft 1993–94 [3]

General characteristics

  • Crew: 2
  • Length: 9.36 m (30 ft 9 in)
  • Wingspan: 9.04 m (29 ft 8 in)
  • Height: 3.60 m (11 ft 10 in)
  • Wing area: 13.58 m2 (146.2 sq ft)
  • Aspect ratio: 6.0:1
  • Empty weight: 1,300 kg (2,866 lb)
  • Max takeoff weight: 2,400 kg (5,291 lb)
  • Fuel capacity: 720 L (190 US gal; 160 imp gal) usable fuel
  • Powerplant: 1 × Garrett TFE109-1 turbofan, 5.92 kN (1,330 lbf) thrust

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 519 km/h (322 mph, 280 kn) at 14,000 ft (4,270 m)
  • Cruise speed: 482 km/h (300 mph, 260 kn) (normal operating speed)
  • Stall speed: 124 km/h (77 mph, 67 kn) (flaps down)
  • Never exceed speed: 638 km/h (396 mph, 344 kn) (Mach 0.70)
  • Ferry range: 1,850 km (1,150 mi, 1,000 nmi) at 20,000 ft (6,100 m) (Max internal fuel)
  • Service ceiling: 11,275 m (36,991 ft)
  • g limits: +7/-3.5
  • Rate of climb: 13 m/s (2,500 ft/min)
  • Takeoff distance to 15 m (50 ft): 655 metres (2,150 ft)
  • Landing distance from 15 m (50 ft): 2,200 ft (671 m)

Armament

  • Hardpoints: 4 with a capacity of 150 kg (330 lb) each,

See also[edit]

Aircraft of comparable role, configuration and era

References[edit]

  1. ^ Simpson 1991, p. 158
  2. ^ a b c d e Taylor 1988, pp. 8–9
  3. ^ Lambert 1993, p. 12
  • Jane's All the World's Aircraft 1985–86. London: Jane's Publishing.
  • Lambert, Mark, ed. (1993). Jane's All The World's Aircraft 1993–94. Coulsdon, UK: Jane's Data Division. ISBN 0-7106-1066-1.
  • Taylor, John W. R., ed. (1988). Jane's All the World's Aircraft 1988-89. London: Jane's Information Group. ISBN 0 7106 0867 5.
  • Taylor, Michael J. H. (1989). Jane's Encyclopedia of Aviation. London: Studio Editions.
  • Simpson, R.W. (1991). Airlife's General Aviation. England: Airlife Publishing. ISBN 1-85310-194-X.