Mystriosuchini

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Mystriosuchini
Temporal range: Late Triassic
Pseudopalatus.jpg
Skull of Machaeroprosopus mccauleyi
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Sauropsida
Infraclass: Archosauromorpha
(unranked): Crurotarsi
Order: Phytosauria
Family: Parasuchidae
Subfamily: Mystriosuchinae
Synonyms
  • Mystriosuchinae Huene, 1915
  • Mystriosuchidae Huene, 1915
  • Pseudopalatinae Long and Murry, 1995

Mystriosuchini is an extinct tribe of derived phytosaurs in the clade Leptosuchomorpha. As with all other phytosaurs, mystriosuchins lived during Late Triassic. The name is derived from the genus Mystriosuchus.

Genera classified in Mystriosuchini include Coburgosuchus, Machaeroprosopus, Mystriosuchus, Nicrosaurus and Redondasaurus.[1][2]

Phylogeny[edit]

Below is a cladogram from Stocker (2012):[3]

Phytosauria 

Wannia scurriensis




Paleorhinus bransoni




"Paleorhinus" sawini


Mystriosuchinae

Brachysuchus megalodon



Angistorhinus




Rutiodon carolinensis



"Machaeroprosopus" zunii



Protome batalaria


Leptosuchomorpha

"Phytosaurus" doughtyi



TMM 31173-120




Leptosuchus crosbiensis



Leptosuchus studeri






Smilosuchus lithodendrorum




Smilosuchus adamanensis



Smilosuchus gregorii






Pravusuchus hortus


Mystriosuchini

Machaeroprosopus mccauleyi




Mystriosuchus westphali



Machaeroprosopus pristinus












References[edit]

  1. ^ Hungerbühler A. 2002. The Late Triassic phytosaur Mystriosuchus westphali, with a revision of the genus. Palaeontology 45 (2): 377-418
  2. ^ Kammerer, C. F., Butler, R. J., Bandyopadhyay, S., Stocker, M. R. (2016), Relationships of the Indian phytosaur Parasuchus hislopi Lydekker, 1885. Papers in Palaeontology, 2: 1–23. doi: 10.1002/spp2.1022
  3. ^ Stocker, M. R. (2012). "A new phytosaur (Archosauriformes, Phytosauria) from the Lot's Wife beds (Sonsela Member) within the Chinle Formation (Upper Triassic) of Petrified Forest National Park, Arizona". Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 32 (3): 573–586. doi:10.1080/02724634.2012.649815.