Radford and Timsbury Halt railway station

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Radford and Timsbury Halt
Location
Place Radford
Area Somerset
Coordinates 51°19′08″N 2°28′15″W / 51.3188°N 2.4709°W / 51.3188; -2.4709Coordinates: 51°19′08″N 2°28′15″W / 51.3188°N 2.4709°W / 51.3188; -2.4709
Operations
Original company Great Western Railway
Platforms 1
History
1910 Opened
1915 Closed
1923 Reopened
1925 Closed
Disused railway stations in the United Kingdom
Closed railway stations in Britain
A B C D–F G H–J K–L M–O P–R S T–V W–Z
170433 at Edinburgh Waverley.JPG UK Railways portal


Radford and Timsbury Halt railway station was on the Camerton branch of the Great Western Railway in Somerset, England. It was in use from 1910 until 1915, and again from 1923 until 1925.

History[edit]

The Bristol and North Somerset Railway (B&NSR) opened a branch line from Hallatrow to Camerton on 1 March 1882, although it had been funded by the Great Western Railway (GWR) which worked the trains on the line from the outset and purchased the B&NSR Company in 1884.[1] The line was extended from Camerton to Limpley Stoke in 1910 where it made a connection with the GWR's Wilts, Somerset and Weymouth Line.[2]

When the line opened were no stations between Hallatrow and Camerton. In 1899 the Timsbury Colliery Company signed an agreement with the GWR for a siding at Radford. The GWR siding was opened for traffic on 19 July 1900 and the line connecting it to the colliery came into use in October that year.[3] Radford and Timsbury Halt opened for passenger trains on 9 May 1910, the same day as the line was extended through to Limpley Stoke.[4] The term 'halt' was used by the GWR to denote railway stations without staff or public goods facilities.

Passenger services on the line were withdrawn on 22 March 1915 due to World War I. They were eventually restored on 9 July 1923, four and a half years after hostilities had ceased. They did not last long as they were withdrawn again on 21 September 1925, never to be resumed.[5] Freight trains continued to operate until 8 February 1932 and the track was lifted shortly afterwards.[6]

Description[edit]

The station was 2.85 miles (4.59 km) from Hallatrow and just 0.58 miles (0.93 km) from Camerton. The timber-built platform was situated on the south side of the line. It was 150 feet (46 m) long, 8 feet (2.4 m) wide, and provided with oil lamps and a corrugated iron shelter. Access was by a footpath from the road bridge that crossed the line at the east end of the station.[4]

No public goods facilities were provided, but a loop siding on the north side of the line immediately to the west of the passenger platform was connected at its east end to a 300 yards (270 m) cable-worked incline up to the colliery. Loaded wagons coming down provided the power to haul empties back up to the colliery.[3]

Services[edit]

Passenger trains on the Hallatrow to Limpley Stoke line were operated by steam railmotors or, later, by auto trains. In 1914 there were five trains each day, Monday to Saturday only. In 1923 this had been reduced to four.[7]


Preceding station Historical railways Following station
Paulton Halt   Great Western Railway
Camerton branch
  Camerton

References[edit]

  1. ^ Maggs, Colin G.; Beale, Gerry (1985). The Camerton Branch. Upper Bucklebury: Wild Swan Publications. pp. 11–14. ISBN 0-906867-25-8. 
  2. ^ Maggs, Colin G.; Beale, Gerry (1985). The Camerton Branch. Upper Bucklebury: Wild Swan Publications. p. 30. 
  3. ^ a b Maggs, Colin G.; Beale, Gerry (1985). The Camerton Branch. Upper Bucklebury: Wild Swan Publications. pp. 45–46. ISBN 0-906867-25-8. 
  4. ^ a b Oakley, Mike (2006). Somerset Railway Stations. Bristol: Redcliffe Press. p. 102. ISBN 1-904537-54-5. 
  5. ^ Maggs, Colin G.; Beale, Gerry (1985). The Camerton Branch. Upper Bucklebury: Wild Swan Publications. pp. 32–33. 
  6. ^ Maggs, Colin G.; Beale, Gerry (1985). The Camerton Branch. Upper Bucklebury: Wild Swan Publications. p. 101. ISBN 0-906867-25-8. 
  7. ^ Maggs, Colin G.; Beale, Gerry (1985). The Camerton Branch. Upper Bucklebury: Wild Swan Publications. pp. 107–108.