Resurrection University

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Resurrection University
Resurrection University Seal.gif
Former names
West Suburban Hospital School for Nurses
West Suburban Hospital School of Nursing
Concordia-West Suburban College of Nursing
West Suburban College of Nursing
TypePrivate Upper division college
AffiliationPresence Health
Religious affiliation
Catholic
PresidentDr. Therese A. Scanlan
Students914 As of November 2017
Undergraduates812 As of November 2017
Postgraduates102 As of November 2017
Location
Chicago
,
Illinois
,
U.S.

41.907257, -87.685302
ColorsBurgundy and Dark Teal          
Websiteresu.edu
Resurrection University logo.png

Resurrection University (ResU) is a private, Catholic university in Chicago, Illinois. It was founded on February 17, 1914. It has two colleges, a College of Nursing and a College of Health Sciences, and offers undergraduate and graduate/professional programs. The university has over 5,600 university alumni. Its campus is located in Wicker Park, a Chicago neighborhood.

History[edit]

Resurrection University, vertical picture

1914: Resurrection University, previously named West Suburban Hospital School for Nurses was founded with the West Suburban Hospital that began serving the Oak Park community on February 11th, 1914[1]. The school officially began on February 17th, offering a diploma program.

1925: A new building was completed for the school on the 7th floor of the medical center, providing students with classrooms, laboratories, dormitories, swimming pool, and a ballroom.[2]

1946: The West Suburban Hospital for Nurses entered into an affiliation with Wheaton College that lasted until 1982[3][4]

1953: The name of the school was changed to West Suburban Hospital School of Nursing

1981: The University was recognized by the Illinois Board of Higher Education, giving degree granting and operating authority to offer a nursing degree.

1982: The Baccalaureate Nursing Program established, including a generic and Registered Nurse completion option.

1985: The University entered into an affiliation with Concordia College (now Concordia University Chicago). Again, the name was changed to: Concordia-West Suburban College of Nursing.[5]

2003: The affiliation with Concordia College ended and the name was revised to: West Suburban College of Nursing.

2004: Resurrection Health Care purchased West Suburban Medical Center and the College of Nursing. West Suburban College of Nursing became a part of Resurrection Health Care.[6]

2008: Higher Learning Commission approved the baccalaureate degrees of health informatics and health administration.

2008: The Master of Science in Nursing program became accredited at the university and the first class to graduate with the MSN degree occurred in 2009.

2010: West Suburban College of Nursing became Resurrection University with a College of Nursing and a College of Health Sciences.[7]

2011: Resurrection Health Care and Provena Health joined together to form Presence Health.[8]

2012: Resurrection University and Concordia University Chicago reestablish the nursing degree program partnership[9][10].[11]

2012: The University moves to the campus of Saint Elizabeth Medical Center in the Wicker Park neighborhood of Chicago.[12][13]

2015: The Saint Francis School of Radiography (SFSOR), was merged with theUniversity, which now offered a Bachelor of Science in Imaging Technology (B.S.I.T.) in the College of Health Sciences. The degree is accredited by the Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology (JRCERT).[14]

2016: Dr. Therese Scanlan assumed the role of President for Resurrection University.[15]

2017: The University's Doctor of Nursing Practice program began in the fall semester.

2018: In March, the affiliation between Resurrection University and Presence Health ended, and Presence Legacy Association became a member of Resurrection University.

Academics[edit]

Resurrection University has two colleges: the College of Nursing and the College of Allied Health.

Accreditation[edit]

Regional[edit]

Specialty[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Oak Leaves". Chicago Tribune. The Historical Society of Oak Park and River Forest. September 16, 1922.
  2. ^ Humiston, Chas. E. (1924). Nosokoma: Nineteen Hundred Twenty-Four. The Historical Society of Oak Park and River Forest: West Suburban Hospital. p. 19.
  3. ^ "Bulletin of Wheaton College: Catalog Number 1961-1962" (PDF). Wheaton College. Wheaton College. Retrieved 5 December 2017.
  4. ^ "Wheaton History A to Z: West Suburban College of Nursing". Wheaton College. Wheaton College. Retrieved 11 December 2017.
  5. ^ Complete Book of Colleges, 2005 (2005 ed.). New York, NY: Random House : Princeton Review Pub. 2004. p. 221. ISBN 9780375764066.
  6. ^ "2008 Annual Hospital Questionnaire" (PDF). Illinois Department of Public Health. Illinois Department of Public Health, Health Systems Development. Retrieved 11 December 2017.
  7. ^ "Statement of Accreditation Status". Higher Learning Commission. Retrieved 5 December 2017.
  8. ^ Schorsch, Kristen (2012-02-17). "Presence Health is new name of combined Provena-Resurrection". Chicago Business. Crain's.
  9. ^ "Concordia, Resurrection universities offer joint nursing degree program". Nurse.com. Nurse.com. Retrieved 5 December 2017.
  10. ^ "Health Informatics and Information Management". Concordia University Chicago. Concordia University Chicago. 2016-07-22. Retrieved 20 October 2017.
  11. ^ "Undergraduate Catalog 2017-2018" (PDF). Concordia University Chicago. Retrieved 5 December 2017.
  12. ^ "Press Release: Mayor Emanuel Announces Reforms That Strengthen Accountability and Transparency of TIF Program". City of Chicago: Mayor Rahm Emanuel. City of Chicago. Retrieved 20 October 2017.
  13. ^ Coorens, Elaine (3 February 2013). ""Resurrection University's move to Wicker Park brings excitement and opportunity". Our Urban Times. Retrieved 10 October 2017.
  14. ^ "Presence Health: Saint Francis School of Radiography" (PDF). Presence Health Radiology. Presence Health. Retrieved 11 December 2017.
  15. ^ "Leadership Transitions". American Health Science Education Consortium – AHSEC News. Fall (5): 3. 2016.AHSEC-Newsletter-Fall-2016.pdf

External links[edit]