Richard E. Tracy

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Richard E. Tracy
Alma mater
Awards
Scientific career
InstitutionsLouisiana State University
Website

Richard E. Tracy is an American forensic pathologist and professor emeritus. His research activities have concentrated on atherosclerosis and hypertension.[1]

Education[edit]

Tracy is a pathologist in the Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center in New Orleans.[2][3] He was a graduate in B.A from the University of Chicago.[4] After his graduation, he joined as freshman-junior years in medical school (1955-1958). During these years he started his research on pathology and acted as USPHS Fellowship Trainee in Pathology. He got his M.D. and Ph.D. in 1961 from the University of Chicago.[5]

Research and career[edit]

Tracy started his career as a pathologist and a research fellowship in the Department of Pathology, University of Chicago. He was an instructor in pathology, University of Chicago. At Oregon Health & Science University, he was an assistant professor of pathology and finally became professor emeritus in LSUHSC from 2005. He also worked as a visiting pathologist LSU division, Charity Hospital, New Orleans.[6]

He is a Member of the Veterans Administration Merit Review Board Pathologist to the Coroner of Washington Parish.

Awards and honors[edit]

He received the Bausch and Lomb Medal for student research in 1961.[citation needed] He also won the Joseph A. Capps Award.[citation needed] He also has memberships in different associations such as the American Heart Association, Council on arteriosclerosis, International Academy of Pathology, American Society of Investigative Pathology, American Medical Association, Louisiana State Medical Society.

Notable publications in journals[edit]

  • Longitudinal and Transverse Dimensions of Hypertrophied Cardiomyocytes in Human Left Ventricle (LV) at Autopsy; Heart Failure Might Result from Changes in Chamber Geometry without Contractile Weakening[7]
  • Heart failure and limit to cardiomyocyte hypertrophy: Lessons from autopsies.[8]
  • Cardiac myocyte sizes in right compared with left ventricle during overweight and hypertension[9]
  • Eccentric may differ from concentric left ventricular hypertrophy because of variations in cardiomyocyte numbers.[10]
  • Bilateral common carotid artery ultrasound for prediction of incident strokes using intima-media thickness and external diameter: an observational study.[11]
  • Cardiomyocyte size estimated from noninvasive measurements of left ventricular wall thickness and chamber diameter.[12]
  • Histologically Measured Cardiomyocyte Hypertrophy Correlates with Body Height as Strongly as with Body Mass Index.[13]
  • Association of Cardiomegaly with Coronary Artery Histopathology and its Relationship to Atheroma.[14]
  • Coronary Artery Circumferential Stress: Departure from Laplace Expectations with Aging.[15]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Richard E. Tracy, MD, PhD - LSUHSC School of Medicine". www.medschool.lsuhsc.edu. Retrieved 2019-06-07.
  2. ^ "Dr. Richard Tracy, MD – New Orleans, LA | Pathology on Doximity". Doximity. Retrieved 2019-06-07.
  3. ^ "Dr. Richard Tracy, MD - Reviews - New Orleans, LA". www.healthgrades.com. Retrieved 2019-06-07.
  4. ^ Tracy Richard E.; Merchant Edmund B.; Kao. Vincent C. (1961-03-01). "On the Antigenic Identity of Human Serum Beta and Alpha-2 Lipoproteins, and Their Identification in the Aortic Intima". Circulation Research. 9 (2): 472–479. doi:10.1161/01.RES.9.2.472.
  5. ^ "Cardiovascular Hypertrophy and Systemic Heart Failure: Critical Correlation Established by Dr. Richard Tracy – Press Release". googleness. Retrieved 2019-06-07.
  6. ^ MENAFN. "Cardiomyocyte Hypertrophy and Systolic Heart Failure: A Critical Correlation Established by Dr. Richard Tracy". menafn.com. Retrieved 2019-06-07.
  7. ^ "Longitudinal and Transverse Dimensions of Hypertrophied Cardiomyocytes in Human Left Ventricle (LV) at Autopsy; Heart Failure Might Result from Changes in Chamber Geometry without Contractile Weakening" (PDF).
  8. ^ "ScopeMed.org - Fulltext article Viewer". www.scopemed.org. doi:10.5455/ejfs.206225. Retrieved 2019-06-07.
  9. ^ Tracy, Richard E. (July 2014). "Cardiac myocyte sizes in right compared with left ventricle during overweight and hypertension". Journal of the American Society of Hypertension: JASH. 8 (7): 457–463. doi:10.1016/j.jash.2014.05.004. ISSN 1878-7436. PMID 25064767.
  10. ^ Tracy, Richard E. (2013-07-01). "Eccentric May Differ From Concentric Left Ventricular Hypertrophy Because of Variations in Cardiomyocyte Numbers". Journal of Cardiac Failure. 19 (7): 517–522. doi:10.1016/j.cardfail.2013.05.002. ISSN 1071-9164. PMID 23834928.
  11. ^ Eigenbrodt, Marsha L.; Evans, Gregory W.; Rose, Kathryn M.; Bursac, Zoran; Tracy, Richard E.; Mehta, Jawahar L.; Couper, David J. (2013-06-15). "Bilateral common carotid artery ultrasound for prediction of incident strokes using intima-media thickness and external diameter: an observational study". Cardiovascular Ultrasound. 11 (1): 22. doi:10.1186/1476-7120-11-22. ISSN 1476-7120. PMC 3686606. PMID 23768019.
  12. ^ Tracy, Richard E. (May 2012). "Cardiomyocyte size estimated from noninvasive measurements of left ventricular wall thickness and chamber diameter". Journal of the American Society of Hypertension: JASH. 6 (3): 185–192. doi:10.1016/j.jash.2012.02.001. ISSN 1878-7436. PMID 22417735.
  13. ^ Tracy, Richard E.; Sander, Gary E. (2011-06-08). "Histologically Measured Cardiomyocyte Hypertrophy Correlates with Body Height as Strongly as with Body Mass Index". Cardiology Research and Practice. 2011. doi:10.4061/2011/658958. ISSN 2090-0597. PMC 3123935. PMID 21738859.
  14. ^ Tracy, Richard Everett (2011). "Association of cardiomegaly with coronary artery histopathology and its relationship to atheroma". Journal of Atherosclerosis and Thrombosis. 18 (1): 32–41. ISSN 1880-3873. PMID 20953090.
  15. ^ Eigenbrodt, Marsha L.; Tracy, Richard E. (2009). "Coronary Artery Circumferential Stress: Departure from Laplace Expectations with Aging". The Scientific World Journal. doi:10.1100/tsw.2009.109. PMC 5823157. PMID 19768351. Retrieved 2019-06-07.