Alabama Independent School Association

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The Alabama Independent School Association was formed in 1966 by a group of schools known as the Alabama Private School Association. Originally a group of eight segregation academies,[1][2] the membership grew to 60 by the 1971–72 school year.[3] In 1990, the group voted to change its name to the Alabama Independent School Association.[4] In 2008, an all-black school, Restoration Academy joined the AISA with no serious incidents.[5] Today, the AISA serves 70 member schools. Most member schools are located in the state of Alabama, but one member school is located in Meridian, MS and one affiliate member is located in Smyrna, TN[6]

The association offers its members with the opportunity to participate in numerous academic competitions,[7] professional development programs,[8] athletic programs[9] and legislative tracking services as well.[10]

In addition to the opportunities to participate in academic competitions, professional development and athletics, the AISA also maintains an accreditation partnership with AdvancED and offers member schools the opportunity for dual accreditation through AISA & AdvancED. This partnership was formed in 2012 after the long history of accreditation being offered through the AISA.[11]

The athletic department of the Alabama Independent School Association sanctions and oversees high school athletics for approximately 50 private schools in the American state of Alabama.[6] Sanctioned varsity and junior varsity sports include the following: football, basketball, baseball, fast-pitch softball, track and field, volleyball, golf, tennis, soccer, and cheerleading.[12] Schools are classified into three classes, according to student enrollment, with championships awarded by class. The AISA also sanctions youth football for second grade through sixth grade.

The AISA offices are located on the campus of Huntingdon College in Montgomery, Alabama.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Adams, Phillip. "SOCIAL CAPITAL, SCHOOL DESEGREGATION AND EDUCATION IN WEST ALABAMA'S BLACK BELT" (PDF). Auburn University. Retrieved 26 January 2015. 
  2. ^ "'Instant Academies' Spring up in State". Florence Times - Tri-Cities daily. 16 May 1973. Retrieved 26 January 2015. 
  3. ^ "The Southern Regional Council Beginning the Fifth Decade: Our Annual Report". 7. 1985: 23. Retrieved 26 January 2015. 
  4. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2014-12-08. Retrieved 2014-12-02. 
  5. ^ Carter, Robert (13 November 2010). "Fairfield school tears down historical ties to AISA, segregation". North Jefferson News. Retrieved 18 December 2017. 
  6. ^ a b http://0101.nccdn.net/1_5/005/2f3/063/Directory-14-15.pdf
  7. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2014-12-08. Retrieved 2014-12-02. 
  8. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2014-12-08. Retrieved 2014-12-02. 
  9. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2014-12-08. Retrieved 2014-12-02. 
  10. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2014-12-08. Retrieved 2014-12-02. 
  11. ^ http://0101.nccdn.net/1_5/019/330/23e/Accreditation-Standards-Manual.pdf
  12. ^ aisaonline.org: Athletic Programs

External links[edit]