Robert A. Bloomer

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Robert A. Bloomer (November 13, 1921 – December 7, 1999) was a Vermont attorney and politician who served as President of the Vermont State Senate.

Biography[edit]

Robert Asa Bloomer was born in Proctor, Vermont on November 13, 1921.[1][2] Bloomer graduated from the University of Vermont in 1943[3] and served as a pilot in the Eighth Air Force of the U.S. Army Air Corps during World War II.[4][5]

In 1947 Bloomer received his law degree from Boston University School of Law 1948, afterwards practicing law in Rutland.[6]

A Republican, in 1963 Bloomer was appointed to the seat in the Vermont Senate that was left vacant by the death of his father, and completed his father's term.[7] He was elected to a full term in 1964 and served until January, 1967.[8]

In 1972 Bloomer was again elected to the Vermont Senate, and served from 1973 to 1985.[9] From 1975 until retiring from the legislature Bloomer was the body's President Pro Tem.[10][11][12]

After leaving the Senate Bloomer practiced law, was involved in several civic organizations, and served as Chairman of the District 1 Environmental Board.[13][14]

Bloomer died in Rutland on December 7, 1999.[15][16] He was buried in Rutland's Evergreen Cemetery.[17]

Family[edit]

Robert A. Bloomer's father Asa S. Bloomer and brother John H. Bloomer both served in the Vermont Senate. Asa Bloomer was Speaker of the Vermont House of Representatives from 1943 to 1945 and served as Senate President in 1949 and 1955, and from 1959 until his death.[18] John H. Bloomer served as Senate President from 1993 to 1995.[19]

Judith Wener Bloomer Crowley (born 1936), the wife of John H. Bloomer and mother of John H. Bloomer Jr., served in the Vermont Senate from 1995 to 1997 and in the Vermont House from 2001 to 2005.[20][21]

John H. Bloomer Jr. (born 1960) served in the Vermont Senate from 1997 to 2005. In 2011 he was appointed Secretary of the Senate.[22][23]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Vermont Birth Records, 1909-2008, Record for Robert Asa Bloomer, accessed June 23, 2012
  2. ^ Vermont Secretary of State, Vermont Legislative Directory, 1979, page 57
  3. ^ Coiner Publications, Inc., Personal Injury Trial Counsel, 1967, Robert A. Bloomer page
  4. ^ Merle Halsey Davis, Edith Rebecca Gates Davis, The Ancestry and Descendants of Solomon Davis (1769-1857), 1967, page 147
  5. ^ U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs BIRLS Death Files, 1850-2010, entry for Robert A. Bloomer, accessed June 23, 2012
  6. ^ Vermont General Assembly, Joint Resolution 69, In Memory of Former Senate President Pro Tempore Robert A. Bloomer, January 5, 2000
  7. ^ Bennington Banner, Bloomer's Son Takes Senate Seat, February 26, 1963
  8. ^ United Press International, Bloomer Runs, Bennington Banner, July 20, 1972
  9. ^ United Press International, Vermont Senate Results, Bennington Banner, November 8, 1972
  10. ^ United Press International, Bloomer named to Succeed Janeway as Senate President, Bennington Banner, January 8, 1975
  11. ^ "Robert A. Bloomer obituary". Rutland Herald. 8 December 1999. Retrieved 22 July 2012. 
  12. ^ Vermont Archives and Records Administration, Presidents Pro Tempore of the Vermont Senate Since 1870, 2011, page 7
  13. ^ Associated Press (8 December 1999). "OBITUARIES / Ex-Vermont State Senator Robert Bloomer". Newsday. Retrieved 22 July 2012. 
  14. ^ Keays, Alan J. (December 1, 1999). "Bloomer Resigns From Act 250 Commission". Rutland Herald. Retrieved 22 July 2012. 
  15. ^ Social Security Death Index, entry for Robert A. Bloomer, accessed June 23, 2012
  16. ^ Alan J. Keays, Rutland Herald, Robert Bloomer, Longtime Senator, Dies at 78, December 8, 1999
  17. ^ Vermont Death Index, 1981-2001, entry for Robert Asa Bloomer, accessed June 23, 2012
  18. ^ James Roger Sharp, Nancy Weatherly Sharp, American Legislative Leaders in the Northeast, 1911-1994, 2000, page 61
  19. ^ "John Bloomer; Vermont Legislator, 64". The New York Times. 11 January 1995. Retrieved 22 July 2012. 
  20. ^ Journal of the Vermont Senate, published by Vermont Senate, February 9, 1995
  21. ^ Vermont Secretary of State, State Representative Election Results, 2004, page 31
  22. ^ Vermont Secretary of State, Biographical Sketches of Federal and State Officers and Members of the General Assembly of 2011-2012, 2011, page 78
  23. ^ Remsen, Nancy (4 January 2011). "John Bloomer Returns to the Senate in a New Role". The Burlington Free Press. Retrieved 22 July 2012. 
Political offices
Preceded by
Edward G. Janeway
President pro tempore of the Vermont State Senate
1975 – 1985
Succeeded by
Peter Welch