Roger de Breteuil, 2nd Earl of Hereford

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Roger de Breteuil, 2nd Earl of Hereford (1056 – after 1087), succeeded in 1071 to the earldom of Hereford and the English estate of his father, William Fitz-Osbern. He is known to history for his role in the Revolt of the Earls[1][2][3]

Disobeying King William[edit]

He did not keep on good terms with William the Conqueror, and in 1075, disregarding the King's prohibition, he married his sister Emma to Ralph Guader, Earl of Norfolk, at the famous bridal of Norwich.

Revolt of the Earls[edit]

Immediately afterwards, the two earls rebelled. Roger, who was to bring his force from the west to join forces with those of the Earl of Norfolk, was held in check at the River Severn by the Worcestershire fyrd, which the English Bishop Wulfstan, Walter de Lacy, and other Normans brought into the field against him.

Trial, sentence, and reprieve[edit]

On the collapse of his confederate's uprising, Roger was tried for treason[4] before the Great Council, for their role in the Revolt of the Earls. Roger was deprived of his lands and earldom in 1075, and sentenced to perpetual imprisonment. Ralph Breton and Waltheof, 1st Earl of Northumberland were charged as co-conspirator.[5]

Roger was released, with other political prisoners, at the death of William I in 1087.

Family[edit]

Though Roger is not known to have married, he left two sons, Reginald and Roger. Living during the reign of Henry I of England, they were described as young men of great promise, but nonetheless were excluded from succeeding to Roger's lands. This has led to disagreement among scholars as to whether or not they were of legitimate birth.

References[edit]

  1. ^ C. P. Lewis, « Breteuil, Roger de, earl of Hereford (fl. 1071–1087) », Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004.
  2. ^ Orderic Vital, Histoire de Normandie, Éd. (Guizot, 1826), vol.II, livre IV, p. 256.
  3. ^ Frank Stenton, Anglo-Saxon England 3rd édition, (Oxford University, 1971), p. 610-613.
  4. ^ Placita Anglo-Normannica [electronic resource] : Law Cases from William I to Richard I - Preserved in Historical Records (London: S. Low, Marston, Searle, & Rivington, 1879) p11
  5. ^ Placita Anglo-Normannica [electronic resource] : Law Cases from William I to Richard I - Preserved in Historical Records (London: S. Low, Marston, Searle, & Rivington, 1879) p11.

See also[edit]