SM U-89

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History
German Empire
Name: U-89
Ordered: 23 June 1915
Builder: Kaiserliche Werft Danzig
Yard number: 33
Laid down: 15 December 1915
Launched: 6 October 1916
Commissioned: 21 June 1917
Fate: Rammed and sunk 12 February 1918
General characteristics [1]
Class and type: German Type U 87 submarine
Displacement:
  • 757 t (745 long tons) surfaced
  • 998 t (982 long tons) submerged
Length:
Beam:
  • 6.20 m (20 ft 4 in) (oa)
  • 4.18 m (13 ft 9 in) (pressure hull)
Height: 9.35 m (30 ft 8 in)
Draught: 3.88 m (12 ft 9 in)
Installed power:
  • 2 × 2,400 PS (1,765 kW; 2,367 shp) surfaced
  • 2 × 1,200 PS (883 kW; 1,184 shp) submerged
Propulsion: 2 shafts, 2 × 1.66 m (5 ft 5 in) propellers
Speed:
  • 16.8 knots (31.1 km/h; 19.3 mph) surfaced
  • 9.1 knots (16.9 km/h; 10.5 mph) submerged
Range:
  • 11,380 nmi (21,080 km; 13,100 mi) at 8 knots (15 km/h; 9.2 mph) surfaced
  • 56 nmi (104 km; 64 mi) at 5 knots (9.3 km/h; 5.8 mph) submerged
Test depth: 50 m (160 ft)
Complement: 4 officers, 32 enlisted
Armament:
Service record
Part of:
Commanders:
  • Kptlt. August Mildenberger[2]
  • 21 June 1917 – 15 January 1918
  • Kptlt. Wilhelm Bauck[3]
  • 16 January – 12 February 1918
Operations: 3 patrols
Victories:
  • 4 merchant ships sunk (8,496 GRT)
  • 1 ship damaged (324 GRT)

SM U-89[Note 1] was one of the 329 submarines serving in the Imperial German Navy in World War I. U-89 was engaged in the naval warfare and took part in the First Battle of the Atlantic.[4] On 12 February 1918, U-89 was rammed and sunk by HMS Roxburgh off Malin Head. There were no survivors.

Design[edit]

German Type U 87 submarines were preceded by the shorter Type U 81 submarines. U-89 had a displacement of 757 tonnes (745 long tons) when at the surface and 998 tonnes (982 long tons) while submerged.[1] She had a total length of 65.80 m (215 ft 11 in), a pressure hull length of 50.07 m (164 ft 3 in), a beam of 6.20 m (20 ft 4 in), a height of 9.35 m (30 ft 8 in), and a draught of 3.88 m (12 ft 9 in). The submarine was powered by two 2,400 metric horsepower (1,800 kW; 2,400 shp) engines for use while surfaced, and two 1,200 metric horsepower (880 kW; 1,200 shp) engines for use while submerged. She had two propeller shafts. She was capable of operating at depths of up to 50 metres (160 ft).[1]

The submarine had a maximum surface speed of 15.6 knots (28.9 km/h; 18.0 mph) and a maximum submerged speed of 8.6 knots (15.9 km/h; 9.9 mph).[1] When submerged, she could operate for 56 nautical miles (104 km; 64 mi) at 5 knots (9.3 km/h; 5.8 mph); when surfaced, she could travel 11,380 nautical miles (21,080 km; 13,100 mi) at 8 knots (15 km/h; 9.2 mph). U-89 was fitted with four 50 centimetres (20 in) torpedo tubes (two at the bow and two at the stern), ten to twelve torpedoes, one 10.5 cm (4.1 in) SK L/45 deck gun, and one 8.8 cm (3.5 in) SK L/30 deck gun. She had a complement of thirty-six (thirty-two crew members and four officers).[1]

Summary of raiding history[edit]

Date Name Nationality Tonnage[Note 2] Fate[5]
2 October 1917 Trafaria  Portugal 1,744 Sunk
3 October 1917 Baron Blantyre  United Kingdom 1,844 Sunk
6 October 1917 Victorine  France 1,241 Sunk
12 December 1917 Reine D'arvor  France 324 Damaged
21 December 1917 Boa Vista  Portugal 3,667 Sunk

References[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ "SM" stands for "Seiner Majestät" (English: His Majesty's) and combined with the U for Unterseeboot would be translated as His Majesty's Submarine.
  2. ^ Tonnages are in gross register tons

Citations[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e Gröner 1991, pp. 12-14.
  2. ^ Helgason, Guðmundur. "WWI U-boat commanders: August Mildenberger". German and Austrian U-boats of World War I - Kaiserliche Marine - Uboat.net. Retrieved 21 January 2015. 
  3. ^ Helgason, Guðmundur. "WWI U-boat commanders: Wilhelm Bauck". German and Austrian U-boats of World War I - Kaiserliche Marine - Uboat.net. Retrieved 21 January 2015. 
  4. ^ Helgason, Guðmundur. "WWI U-boats: U 89". German and Austrian U-boats of World War I - Kaiserliche Marine - Uboat.net. Retrieved 25 January 2010. 
  5. ^ Helgason, Guðmundur. "Ships hit by U 89". German and Austrian U-boats of World War I - Kaiserliche Marine - Uboat.net. Retrieved 21 January 2015. 

Bibliography[edit]

  • Gröner, Erich; Jung, Dieter; Maass, Martin (1991). U-boats and Mine Warfare Vessels. German Warships 1815–1945. 2. Translated by Thomas, Keith; Magowan, Rachel. London: Conway Maritime Press. ISBN 0-85177-593-4.