Samuel Alba

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Samuel Alba
Assumed office
1992

Samuel Alba is a United States magistrate judge for the United States District Court for the District of Utah.

Early life and education[edit]

Alba was born in 1947.

Alba graduated from Utah State University in 1969 with a bachelor's degree in political science.[1] He graduated from the Arizona State University College of Law in 1972.[1]

Career[edit]

From 1972 to 1977, Alba worked at the Federal Public Defenders' Office in Phoenix, Arizona.[2] From 1977 to 1980, Alba worked at the Phoenix law firm of Gama, Iniguez, Guerrero & Albaal, where he practiced in the area of personal injury and criminal defense.[2][3]

On October 8, 1980, Alba was admitted to the Utah State Bar.[3] From 1980 to 1987, Alba worked as first assistant and then chief of the criminal section at the U.S. Attorney's Office for the District of Utah in Salt Lake City.[2] From 1987 to 1992, Albra was a shareholder at the Salt Lake City firm of Yeates, Prince, and Geldzhaler, practicing in the areas of commercial litigation and white-collar criminal defense.[2]

Alba has been a federal magistrate judge for the United States District Court for the District of Utah since August 1992.[1] He was chief magistrate judge from 2003 to 2008.[2] He serves on the Judicial Conference Committee on Defender Services, and is co-chair of the building committee for the District of Utah.[3]

Alba has been involved in several notable court cases:

On 2005, the Utah Minority Bar Association honored Alba as one of the first 50 minority lawyers in Utah.[2] In 2009, Alba was included in Latinos in Utah, book recognizing the contributions made by Latinos in the State of Utah.[2] In 2010, Alba delivered a speech entitled "The Changing Face of Law in Latin America" as part of Utah State University's College of Humanities and Social Sciences Distinguished Alumni Speaker series.[9]

Personal life[edit]

Alba was married to Nancy Alba until she died from breast cancer in 1992. Alba later married Anne Swensen. He has four children and eight grandchildren.[1][2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Judge Samuel Alba: Humanities and Social Sciences' Distinguished Speaker (November 16, 2010). Utah State University.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h Magistrate Samuel Alba, Latinos in Utah.
  3. ^ a b c First 50 Celebrating Diversity in the Law. Utah Minority Bar Association.
  4. ^ Jennifer Dobner, Judge OKs new mental test in Elizabeth Smart case (November 12, 2008). Associated Press.
  5. ^ Brandon Loomis, Artifact traffickers sentenced to probation (September 16, 2007). Salt Lake Tribune.
  6. ^ Judy Fahys, Bugman, ex-worker plead guilty in Layton pesticide deaths (October 11, 2011). Salt Lake Tribune.
  7. ^ Judy Fahys, Exterminators plead 'not guilty' in pesticide deaths (February 25, 2011). Salt Lake Tribune.
  8. ^ Brad Harris, Two Cases Feature Extreme Sanctions for Preservation Failures; Both Cite a Failure to Issue a Legal Hold as Key Factor (April 4, 2011). Legal Hold Pro Tracker.
  9. ^ Judge Samuel Alba: Humanities and Social Sciences' Distinguished Speaker (November 16, 2010). Utah State University.