Scott Denning

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A. Scott Denning
Alma materUniversity of Maine, Colorado State University
Spouse(s)Yes
Children2[1]
AwardsMonfort Professor Award from Colorado State University, 2002[2]
Scientific career
FieldsAtmospheric science
InstitutionsUniversity of California at Santa Barbara, Colorado State University
ThesisA study of the transport, sources, and sinks of atmospheric CO₂ using a general circulation model (1994)
Websitewww.atmos.colostate.edu/faculty/denning.php

A. Scott Denning is a climate scientist and professor of atmospheric science at Colorado State University, whose faculty he joined in 1998. He is known for his research into atmosphere-biosphere interactions, the global carbon cycle, and atmospheric carbon dioxide.[3] He firmly supports action to avoid dangerous climate change.[4] He has also argued that, if no action is taken on the matter, global warming could cause the climate of Colorado to resemble the current climate of its neighbors to the south, such as southern New Mexico, Texas and Mexico.[5]

Education and scientific career[edit]

Denning received his BA in geology from the University of Maine and his MS and PhD in atmospheric science from Colorado State University in 1993 and 1994, respectively.[3] He then spent two years as an assistant professor in the Donald Bren School of Environmental Science and Management at the University of California at Santa Barbara.[3] He joined the faculty of Colorado State University in 1998, and become the director of education for the Center for Multi-Scale Modeling of Atmospheric Processes in 2006.[3] Denning also worked on the Orbiting Carbon Observatory's scientific team.[6][7]

Debates[edit]

Denning has appeared twice at the Heartland Institute's International Conference on Climate Change. In 2011, Denning debated skeptical climatologist Roy Spencer at the 6th International Conference on Climate Change.[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Scott Denning
  2. ^ "Talk on climatology". Bangor Daily News. 14 February 2008. Retrieved 15 September 2014.
  3. ^ a b c d A. Scott Denning
  4. ^ Finding Common Ground with Climate-Change Contrarians
  5. ^ Brown, Eric (11 June 2014). "Recent Greeley talks on ag, climate simultaneously bring out optimism, concern". Greeley Tribune. Retrieved 15 September 2014.
  6. ^ Morello, Lauren (25 February 2009). "Scientists Mull Future After Carbon Satellite Crash". New York Times. Retrieved 15 September 2014.
  7. ^ Llanos, Miguel (25 February 2009). "Satellite failure delays case of the missing CO2". NBC News. Retrieved 15 September 2014.
  8. ^ Zwick, Steve (30 April 2012). "Heartland Channels Alfred E. Newman And Emily Litella In Climate Debate". Forbes. Retrieved 15 September 2014.