Sebag Shaw

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Sir Sebag Shaw (26 December 1906– 27 December 1982)[1] was a British barrister and judge.

Sebag Sochaczewski (later Shaw) was born in East London to Chaim Sochaczewski (later naturalised as 'Henry Shaw'; of Polish origin), owner of a photographic studio, and Marie (née Baumgart), and educated at Central Foundation Boys' School and University College London (LL.B). In his youth he had suffered a severe attack of polio, which left him with a pronounced limp, nevertheless becoming a skilled swimmer, rower and horseman. He was called 'Sib' by family and friends.[2] In 1928, he married Sally, daughter of Oscar Baumgart.[3] He was called to the Bar from Gray's Inn in 1931, appointed Q.C. in 1967, and Bencher of Gray's Inn that same year, being later Leader of the South Eastern Circuit.[4] Shaw served from 1958 to 1968 as Honorary Recorder of Ipswich, succeeding Sir Stephen Gerald Howard, QC, MP (1947–1958). Shaw was succeeded by the Hon. William McLaren Howard, QC.

Notable cases[edit]

In 1955 Shaw was junior counsel to Aubrey Melford Stevenson for the defence in the trial of Ruth Ellis; she was the last woman hanged in the United Kingdom.[5]

Further career[edit]

Knighted in 1968, Shaw was appointed a High Court judge and promoted to be a Lord Justice of Appeal in 1975; he served in this capacity until his death. He chaired the Justice Annual members conference in 1973. Shaw was a Member of the Bar Council from 1964-8, and of the Parole Board from 1971-4 (Vice-Chairman 1973-4).[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ The Palgrave Dictionary of Anglo-Jewish History, W. Rubinstein and Michael A. Jolles, 2011
  2. ^ Graya: A Magazine for Members of Gray's Inn, issue 84, 1986, 'In Memoriam Master Sir Sebag Shaw, by Master Sir William Mars-Jones', pg 24
  3. ^ Debrett's Peerage and Baronetage, 1980, ed. Patrick Montague-Smith, pg 294
  4. ^ The Palgrave Dictionary of Anglo-Jewish History, W. Rubinstein and Michael A. Jolles, 2011
  5. ^ Searching for the Truth about Ruth Ellis By Monica Weller
  6. ^ The Palgrave Dictionary of Anglo-Jewish History, W. Rubinstein and Michael A. Jolles, 2011