Shamus Khan

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Shamus Khan
Born1978 (age 40–41)
NationalityAmerican
OccupationSociologist, professor

Shamus Khan (born 1978) is an American sociologist. He is a professor at Columbia University, where he serves as the chair of the sociology department. He writes on elites, inequality, and American culture. His work has appeared in numerous national and international media outlets.[1]

Early life[edit]

Khan was born in New York to immigrant parents.[2] His mother, Mary Khan, is a nurse. His father, M. Akmal Khan, is a surgeon.[3] He has an older brother, Omar Khan, who has a PhD in Political Science from Oxford and is the director of the Runnymede Trust.[4]

Khan attended St. Paul's School in Concord, New Hampshire, graduating magna cum laude with distinction in Math, Science, Music, and Latin in 1996. He won the Howe Music Prize and the Rector's Award upon graduation. He graduated in 2000 from Haverford College, and received his MS in 2006 and his PhD in 2008 from the University of Wisconsin–Madison. He studied with Robert M. Hauser, Erik Olin Wright, and Myra Marx Ferree. His advisor was Mustafa Emirbayer. In 2007 he began teaching at Columbia University.

Career[edit]

He has lectured and held visiting professor positions around the world.[5] In 2014 he served as Directeur d’études invité at the École des hautes études en sciences sociales, and the Hallsworth Visiting Professor at the University of Manchester. In 2010-11 he was a fellow at the Dorothy and Lewis B. Cullman Center for Scholars and Writers in the New York Public Library.[6] He is the director of the Russell Sage Foundation research network which studies the political influence of economic elites,[7] and is leading a research program that uses the archives of the New York Philharmonic to understand the long-term historical composition of classical music concert-goers.[8] He is currently the Editor of Public Culture.[9]

Contributions[edit]

Khan has made contributions to the areas of inequality,[10][11] cultural sociology,[12] research methodology,[13][14] and most of all to the sociology of elites.[15][16][17] His book, Privilege: The Making of an Adolescent Elite at St. Paul's School, was published in 2011 by Princeton University Press.[18] It won the C. Wright Mills Book Award in 2011. It was widely reviewed in both conservative and liberal circles.[19][20][21][22][23][24]

In addition to his academic work, Khan has written extensively for the popular press. He served as a columnist for Time magazine,[25] and has written op-eds and articles for The New York Times,[26][27] The New Yorker,[28] Al Jazeera America,[29] Public Books,[30] and Good Magazine.[31]

Publications[edit]

  • Shamus Khan and Dana Fisher (2013), The Practice of Research. New York: Oxford University Press.
  • Shamus Rahman Khan (2013), Privilege: The Making of an Adolescent Elite at St. Paul's School. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Media". Shamus Rahman Khan. Retrieved 16 December 2014.
  2. ^ "Khan, S.R.: Privilege: The Making of an Adolescent Elite at St. Paul's School. (eBook and Paperback)". Press.princeton.edu. Retrieved 16 December 2014.
  3. ^ "Khan, S.R.: Privilege: The Making of an Adolescent Elite at St. Paul's School. (eBook and Paperback)". Press.princeton.edu. Retrieved 16 December 2014.
  4. ^ "Runnymede Trust - Staff Team". Runnymedetrust.org. Retrieved 16 December 2014.
  5. ^ "CV". Shamus Rahman Khan. Shamuskhan.wordpress.com. Retrieved 16 December 2014.
  6. ^ "The New York Public Library's Dorothy and Lewis B. Cullman Center for Scholars and Writers Announces 2011-2012 Fellows". Nypl.org. Retrieved 16 December 2014.
  7. ^ "The Political Influence of Economic Elites". Russellsage.org. Retrieved 16 December 2014.
  8. ^ "Interdisciplinary Center for Innovative Theory and Empirics - INCITE - Subscribers to the NY Philharmonic, 1842-Present". Incite.columbia.edu. Retrieved 16 December 2014.
  9. ^ "Public Culture". Retrieved 27 January 2017.
  10. ^ "Your Money". The New York Times. Retrieved 16 December 2014.
  11. ^ "The Political Influence of Economic Elites". Russellsage.org. Retrieved 16 December 2014.
  12. ^ "Interdisciplinary Center for Innovative Theory and Empirics - INCITE - Subscribers to the NY Philharmonic, 1842-Present". Incite.columbia.edu. Retrieved 16 December 2014.
  13. ^ "The Practice of Research". Global.oup.com. Retrieved 16 December 2014.
  14. ^ "Talk Is Cheap". Smr.sagepub.com. Retrieved 16 December 2014.
  15. ^ "Your Money". The New York Times. Retrieved 16 December 2014.
  16. ^ "The Sociology of Elites" Annual Review of Sociology
  17. ^ "The Political Influence of Economic Elites". Russellsage.org. Retrieved 16 December 2014.
  18. ^ "Khan, S.R.: Privilege: The Making of an Adolescent Elite at St. Paul's School. (eBook and Paperback)". Press.princeton.edu. Retrieved 16 December 2014.
  19. ^ Aditya Chakrabortty. "More modern and more open, but the posh are back in charge". The Guardian. Retrieved 16 December 2014.
  20. ^ "Top of the Class". The American Conservative. Theamericanconservative.com. Retrieved 16 December 2014.
  21. ^ Mike Pride. "Creating a new elite". Concordmonitor.com. Retrieved 16 December 2014.
  22. ^ "Elite of St. Paul's learn the lessons of privilege". BuffaloNews.com. Retrieved 16 December 2014.
  23. ^ Robin D. Schatz (24 February 2011). "Elite St. Paul's Students Read 'Beowulf,' Prep for Ivies: Books". Bloomberg.com. Retrieved 16 December 2014.
  24. ^ "The". Boston.com. Retrieved 16 December 2014.
  25. ^ "Interdisciplinary Center for Innovative Theory and Empirics - INCITE - Subscribers to the NY Philharmonic, 1842-Present". Incite.columbia.edu. Retrieved 16 December 2014.
  26. ^ Shamus Khan. "The New Elitists". The New York Times. Retrieved 16 December 2014.
  27. ^ Shamus Khan : Opinionator. "We Are Not All in This Together". The New York Times. Retrieved 16 December 2014.
  28. ^ "A Better Way to Pay Workers". The New Yorker. 17 January 2014. Retrieved 16 December 2014.
  29. ^ "Shamus Khan". America.aljazeera.com. Retrieved 16 December 2014.
  30. ^ "Public Books — Articles by Shamus Khan". Publicbooks.org. Retrieved 16 December 2014.
  31. ^ "GOOD Magazine - #shamus khan". Magazine.good.is. Retrieved 16 December 2014.