Snob screen

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
A row of snob screens, at The Lamb, in Bloomsbury

A snob screen is a device found in some British public houses of the Victorian era. Usually installed in sets, they comprise an etched glass pane in a movable wooden frame and were intended to allow middle class drinkers to see working class drinkers in an adjacent bar, but not to be seen by them,[1] and to be undisturbed by the bar staff.[2]

Pubs with surviving snob screens include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Brandwood, Geoff (2013). Britain's Best Real Heritage Pubs. CAMRA Books. ISBN 978-1-85249-304-2. 
  2. ^ a b "Snob Screens". Beer Lens. Retrieved 21 December 2015. 
  3. ^ "Bunch of Grapes". Historic Pub Interiors. Campaign for Real Ale. Retrieved 21 December 2015. 
  4. ^ "Crown & Greyhound". Historic Pub Interiors. Campaign for Real Ale. Retrieved 21 December 2015. 
  5. ^ "The Gate". Historic Pub Interiors. Campaign for Real Ale. Retrieved 21 December 2015. 
  6. ^ "Posada, Wolverhampton". Historic Pub Interiors. Campaign for Real Ale. Retrieved 21 December 2015. 
  7. ^ "Crown". Historic Pub Interiors. Campaign for Real Ale. Retrieved 21 December 2015. 
  8. ^ "Travellers Friend". Historic Pub Interiors. Campaign for Real Ale. Retrieved 21 December 2015. 
  9. ^ Stapley, Fiona (2015). Good Pub Guide 2016. Random House. ISBN 9781473527492. 
  10. ^ "Nova Scotia". The Good Pub Guide. Retrieved 21 December 2015.