Snota

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Snota
SnotaFromVassnebba.jpg
Snota seen from Vassnebba (west). Litjsnota to the left.
Highest point
Elevation1,668 m (5,472 ft)
Prominence880 m (2,890 ft) [1]
Isolation21.18 kilometres (13.16 mi)
Coordinates62°51′28″N 09°05′44″E / 62.85778°N 9.09556°E / 62.85778; 9.09556Coordinates: 62°51′28″N 09°05′44″E / 62.85778°N 9.09556°E / 62.85778; 9.09556
Geography
Map of the location
Map of the location
Snota
Location in Møre og Romsdal
LocationSurnadal, Møre og Romsdal, Norway
Parent rangeTrollheimen
Topo map1420 I Snota
Snota seen from Trollhetta (east).

Snota is a prominent mountain in the Trollheimen mountain range in the municipality of Surnadal in Møre og Romsdal county, Norway. It is also the highest mountain in the municipality of Surnadal. It lies west of the mountain Trollhetta and north of the mountain Neådalssnota.

The peak is accessible from a parking lot by the lake Gråsjøen, from the cabin Trollheimshytta (owned by the Norwegian Mountain Touring Association), and also from Vindøldalen/Vassdalen valley to the west (though less common).

The main peak is 1,668 metres (5,472 ft) tall and approximately 1 kilometre (0.62 mi) to the north, there is the neighboring 1,562-metre (5,125 ft) tall summit of Litjsnota. The south wall of Snota is 200 metres (660 ft) high and it was first climbed in 1994. The first winter ascent was in 1997. Below the wall is the small Snota glacier.[2]

1986 Vassdalen Avalanche[edit]

On March 5, 1986, 31 members of the Norwegian Army ski patrol, from the North Norway Brigade taking part in the NATO winter exercise called "Anchor express" were struck by an avalanche in Vassdalen.[3] The avalanche struck after 1300 hours, while they were moving snowmobiles along a stream valley on the north side of Storebalak. Sixteen of the soldiers were killed.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Snota 1668 moh - fakta" (in Norwegian). Toppomania. Retrieved 2010-12-07.
  2. ^ "Climbing guide for Snota" (in Norwegian). Archived from the original on 2011-02-15. Retrieved 2010-12-07.
  3. ^ Services, From Times Wire (1986-03-05). "Slide Kills 7 Norwegians, 11 Missing in NATO Games". Los Angeles Times. ISSN 0458-3035. Retrieved 2016-02-06.
  4. ^ Lied, Karstein (1988-05-01). "The avalanche accident at Vassdalen, Norway, 5 March 1986". Cold Regions Science and Technology. 15 (2): 137–150. doi:10.1016/0165-232X(88)90060-2.

External links[edit]

  • Media related to Snota at Wikimedia Commons