South Australian state election, 1927

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South Australian state election, 1927
South Australia
← 1924 26 March 1927 (1927-03-26) 1930 →

All 46 seats in the South Australian House of Assembly
24 seats were needed for a majority
  First party Second party Third party
  Richard Layton Butler.jpg Lionel Hill1.JPG Archiecameron.jpg
Leader Richard L. Butler Lionel Hill Archie Cameron
Party Liberal Federation Labor Country
Leader since 17 December 1925 28 August 1926 26 March 1927
Leader's seat Wooroora Port Pirie Wooroora
Last election 17 seats 27 seats 2 seats
Seats won 23 seats 16 seats 5 seats
Seat change Increase6 Decrease11 Increase3
Percentage 40.00% 48.00% 5.50%
Swing Decrease1.7% Decrease0.37 Decrease3.50

Premier before election

Lionel Hill
Labor

Elected Premier

Richard L. Butler
Liberal Federation

State elections were held in South Australia on 26 March 1927. All 46 seats in the South Australian House of Assembly were up for election. The incumbent Australian Labor Party government led by Premier of South Australia Lionel Hill was defeated by the opposition Liberal Federation led by Leader of the Opposition Richard L. Butler, and the Country Party (SA) led by Archie Cameron. Each district elected multiple members, with voters casting multiple votes.

Before the election, the Liberal Federation attempted to form a coalition with the Country Party, but when this was rejected, Country Party candidates were given no Liberal opposition in six seats in five rural electorates.[1]

House of Assembly (FPTP) — Turnout 77.4% (Non-CV) — Informal 1.8%
Party Votes  % Swing (pp) Seats Change (seats)
  Australian Labor Party 243,450 47.99 −0.37 16 -11
  Liberal Federation 203,050 40.00 −1.70 23 +6
  Country Party (SA) 27,617 5.50 −3.50 5 +3
  Independent 20,720 5.10 +4.60 1 +1
  Protestant Labor Party 10,560 2.08 * 1 *
  Single Tax 1,923 0.40 −0.20 0 0
  Total 507,320     46
  Liberal Federation/Country coalition WIN 28 *
  Australian Labor Party 16 -11

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "History of South Australian elections 1857-2006, volume 1: ECSA". Dean Jaensch. ECSA. 1 November 2013. Retrieved 5 January 2016.