Stacey Enos

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Stacey Enos
Personal information
Date of birth (1964-02-04) February 4, 1964 (age 55)[1]
Place of birth Tampa, Florida, United States
Playing position Defender[1]
College career
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1982–1985 North Carolina Tar Heels 79 (16)
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
2001–2003 Asheville Splash
National team
1985–1986 United States 10 (0)
Teams managed
1994–1995 Seattle Redhawks (assistant)
1996–2001 Utah State Aggies
2001–2017 Warren Wilson College
2001–2004 Highland Football Club (director)
2018 Asheville City SC
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only

Stacey Enos (born February 4, 1964) is an American former soccer player who played as a defender, making ten appearances for the United States women's national team.

Career[edit]

In college, Enos played for the North Carolina Tar Heels from 1982 to 1985, where she was a letter-winner. With the team she won the first three NCAA national championship titles in 1982, 1983, and 1984.[2] In 1984 she was included in the All-NCAA College Cup Selection, and in 1985 she was selected as an NSCAA Second-Team All-American.[3] In total, she made 79 appearances for the Tar Heels, scoring 16 goals and registering 16 assists.[4][5][6][7]

Enos made her international debut for the United States on August 18, 1985 in the team's inaugural match in the Mundialito against Italy. In total, she made ten appearances for the U.S., earning her final cap on July 26, 1986 in a friendly match against Italy.[1]

In 2006 she was honored as a "Pioneer of the Game" by the North Carolina Soccer Hall of Fame.[8] In 1994, Enos began working as an assistant coach with the Seattle Redhawks women's soccer team, before becoming the head coach of the Utah State Aggies in 1996. In 2001, she joined Warren Wilson College in Asheville, North Carolina to serve as the athletic director and head coach of the women's soccer team, where she remained until 2017.[9] She also served as the director of a local youth team, Highland Football Club, from 2001 until 2004. In 2018, she served as the inaugural head coach of the Asheville City SC women's team in the WPSL,[10] where she won the South Region Carolinas Conference Coach of the Year award.[11]

Personal life[edit]

Enos moved to North Carolina in 2001, and currently works as a real estate broker and serves on the Asheville Buncombe Sports Commission.[10]

Career statistics[edit]

International[edit]

United States[1]
Year Apps Goals
1985 4 0
1986 6 0
Total 10 0

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "2019 U.S. Women's National Team Media Guide" (PDF). United States Soccer Federation. 2019. Archived (PDF) from the original on August 11, 2019. Retrieved August 11, 2019.
  2. ^ McCormick, Fred (June 24, 2015). "Warren Wilson soccer coach played on first US women's team". Black Mountain News. Archived from the original on August 11, 2019. Retrieved August 11, 2019.
  3. ^ "Carolina: 2016 Women's Soccer Media Guide" (PDF). North Carolina Tar Heels. 2016. Archived (PDF) from the original on August 11, 2019. Retrieved August 11, 2019.
  4. ^ "University of North Carolina: 1982 Women's Soccer Statistics" (PDF). North Carolina Tar Heels. 1982. Archived (PDF) from the original on August 11, 2019. Retrieved August 11, 2019.
  5. ^ "University of North Carolina: 1983 Women's Soccer Statistics" (PDF). North Carolina Tar Heels. 1983. Archived (PDF) from the original on August 11, 2019. Retrieved August 11, 2019.
  6. ^ "University of North Carolina: 1984 Women's Soccer Statistics" (PDF). North Carolina Tar Heels. 1984. Archived (PDF) from the original on August 11, 2019. Retrieved August 11, 2019.
  7. ^ "University of North Carolina: 1985 Women's Soccer Statistics" (PDF). North Carolina Tar Heels. 1985. Archived (PDF) from the original on August 11, 2019. Retrieved August 11, 2019.
  8. ^ "Pioneer of the Game". Pioneer of the Game. Archived from the original on August 11, 2019. Retrieved August 11, 2019.
  9. ^ "U.S. WNT Flashback – 20th Anniversary of First-Ever Match: Stacey Enos". USSoccer.com. United States Soccer Federation. Archived from the original on July 4, 2006. Retrieved August 11, 2019.
  10. ^ a b "ACSC announce first women's head coach". Asheville City SC. December 14, 2017. Archived from the original on August 11, 2019. Retrieved August 11, 2019.
  11. ^ "2018 Best of WPSL—South Region revealed". Women's Premier Soccer League. Oklahoma City. August 15, 2018. Archived from the original on August 11, 2019. Retrieved August 11, 2019.