United States women's national soccer team

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"United States women's national football team" redirects here. For other uses, see United States women's national football team (disambiguation).
United States
Shirt badge/Association crest
Nickname(s) USWNT
Team USA
The Stars and Stripes
The Yanks
Association United States Soccer Federation
Confederation CONCACAF
(North, Central America and the Caribbean)
Sub-confederation NAFU (North America)
Head coach Jillian Ellis
Captain Carli Lloyd
Becky Sauerbrunn
Most caps Kristine Lilly (354)
Top scorer Abby Wambach (184)
FIFA code USA
First colors
Second colors
FIFA ranking
Current 1 Steady (June 24, 2016)
Highest 1 (July 2003 – September 2003, March 2005 – May 2005, March 2007 – September 2007, March 2008 – November 2014, July 2015–)
Lowest 2 (October 2003 – February 2005, June 2005 – February 2007, October 2007 – February 2008, December 2014 – June 2015)
First international
 Italy 1–0 United States 
(Jesolo, Italy; August 18, 1985)
Biggest win
 United States 14–0 Dominican Rep. 
(Vancouver, BC, Canada; January 20, 2012)
Biggest defeat
 Brazil 4–0 United States 
(Hangzhou, China; September 27, 2007)
World Cup
Appearances 7 (first in 1991)
Best result Gold medal with cup.svg Winners (1991, 1999, 2015)
CONCACAF Championship
& Gold Cup
Appearances 8 (first in 1991)
Best result Gold medal with cup.svg Winners (1991, 1993, 1994, 2000, 2002, 2006, 2014)
Olympics
Appearances 6 (first in 1996)
Best result Gold medal with cup.svg Winners (1996, 2004, 2008, 2012)

The United States women's national soccer team (USWNT) represents the United States in international soccer competitions at the senior level. It is governed by United States Soccer Federation and competes in CONCACAF (the Confederation of North, Central American and Caribbean Association Football). The team has been one of the most successful in international women's soccer, winning three Women's World Cup titles (including the first ever Women's World Cup in 1991), four Olympic women's gold medals, seven CONCACAF Gold Cup wins, and ten Algarve Cups.[1] It medaled in every single World Cup and Olympic tournament in women's soccer history from 1991 to 2015, before being knocked out in the quarterfinals of the 2016 Olympics, after a penalty shoot-out.

After being ranked No. 2 on average from 2003 to 2008 in the FIFA Women's World Rankings,[2] the team was ranked No. 1 continuously from March 2008 to December 2014,[3] falling back behind Germany, the only other team to occupy the No. 1 position in the rankings' history. The team is currently ranked No. 1, moving back into the position on July 10, 2015, due to its victory in the 2015 World Cup. The team was selected as the U.S. Olympic Committee's Team of the Year in 1997 and 1999,[4] and Sports Illustrated chose the entire team as 1999 Sportswomen of the Year for its usual Sportsman of the Year honor.[5]

History[edit]

The team played its first match at the Mundialito tournament on August 18, 1985, coached by Mike Ryan, in which they lost 1–0 to Italy.[6]

1990s[edit]

The U.S. team's first major victory came at the 1991 World Championship (retroactively named the 1991 Women's World Cup). The U.S. cruised to lopsided victories in the quarterfinals and semifinals, before defeating Norway 2–1 in the final. Michelle Akers was the team's leading scorer with 10 goals, including the team's both goals in the final; and Carin Jennings won the Golden Ball as the tournament's best player.

Julie Foudy, Kristine Lilly, and the 1999 team started a revolution towards women's team sports in America. Arguably their most influential and memorable victory came in the 1999 World Cup when they defeated China 5–4 in a penalty shoot-out following a 0–0 draw after extended time.[7] With this win they emerged onto the world stage and brought significant media attention to women's soccer and athletics. On July 10, 1999, over 90,000 people (the largest ever for a women's sporting event and one of the largest attendances in the world for a tournament game final) filled the Rose Bowl to watch the United States play China in the Final. After a back and forth game, the score was tied 0–0 at full-time, and remained so after extra time, leading to a penalty kick shootout. With Briana Scurry's save of China's third kick, the score was 4–4 with only Brandi Chastain left to shoot. She scored and won the game for the United States. Chastain famously dropped to her knees and whipped off her shirt, celebrating in her sports bra, which later made the cover of Sports Illustrated and the front pages of newspapers around the country and world.[8] This win influenced girls to want to play soccer on a team.[9][10]

2000s[edit]

In the 2003 FIFA Women's World Cup, the U.S. defeated Norway 1–0 in the quarterfinals, but lost 0–3 to Germany in the semifinals. The team then defeated Canada 3–1 to claim third place.[11] Abby Wambach was the team's top scorer with three goals; Joy Fawcett and Shannon Boxx made the tournament's all-star team.

At the 2007 FIFA Women's World Cup, the U.S. defeated England 3–0 in the quarterfinals, but then suffered its most lopsided loss in team history when it lost to Brazil 0–4 in the semifinals.[12] The U.S. recovered to defeat Norway to take third place. Abby Wambach was the team's leading scorer with 6 goals, and Kristine Lilly was the only American named to the tournament's all-star team.

2010s[edit]

In the quarterfinal of the 2011 Women's World Cup in Germany, the U.S. defeated Brazil 5–3 on penalty kicks. Abby Wambach's goal in the 122nd minute to tie the game 2–2 has been voted the greatest goal in U.S. soccer history and the greatest goal in Women's World Cup history.[13][13][14]" The U.S. then beat France 3–1 in the semifinal, but lost to Japan on penalty kicks in the 2011 Final. Hope Solo was named the tournament's best goalkeeper, and Abby Wambach won the silver ball as the tournament's second best player.

In the 2012 Summer Olympics, the U.S. won the gold medal for the fourth time in five Olympics by defeating Japan 2–1 in front of 80,203 fans at Wembley Stadium, a record for a women's soccer game at the Olympics.[15] The United States advanced to face Japan for the gold medal by winning the semifinal against Canada, a 4–3 victory at the end of extra time.[16] The 2012 London Olympics marked the first time the USWNT won every game en route to the gold medal and set an Olympic women's team record of 16 goals scored.[16]

A parade in Manhattan celebrating their 2015 World Cup victory.

The National Women's Soccer League started in 2013, and provided competitive games, as well as opportunities to players on the fringes of the squad.[17][18] The U.S. had a 43-game unbeaten streak that spanned two years — the streak began with a 4–0 win over Sweden in the 2012 Algarve Cup, and came to an end after a 1–0 loss against Sweden in the 2014 Algarve Cup.[19][20]

The USA defeated Japan 5–2 in the final of the 2015 World Cup, becoming the first team in history to have won three Women's World Cup titles. Carli Lloyd achieved the fastest hat-trick from kick-off in World Cup history, and Abby Wambach was greeted with a standing ovation for her last World Cup match.[21] Following their 2015 World Cup win, the team was honored with a ticker tape parade in New York City, the first for a women's sports team. Sports Illustrated celebrated them with 25 covers of the magazine.[22] President Barack Obama welcomed them to the White House, stating, "Playing like a girl means you're the best."[23][24] On December 16, 2015, however, a 0–1 loss to China meant the team's first home loss since 2004, ending their 104-game home unbeaten streak.[citation needed]

In the 2016 Olympics, the U.S. drew against Sweden in the quarter-finals; in following the penalty kick phase, Sweden won the game 4–3. The loss marked the first time that the USWNT did not advance to the gold medal game of the Olympics, and the first time that the USWNT failed to advance to the semifinal round of a major tournament.[25]

Team image[edit]

Media coverage[edit]

U.S. TV coverage for the five Women's World Cups from 1995 to 2011 was provided by ESPN/ABC and Univision,[26][27] while coverage rights for the three Women's World Cups from 2015 to 2023 were awarded to Fox Sports and Telemundo.[28][29] In May 2014 a deal was signed to split TV coverage of other USWNT games between ESPN, Fox Sports, and Univision through the end of 2022.[30] The USWNT games in the 2014 CONCACAF Women's Championship and the 2015 Algarve Cup were broadcast by Fox Sports.[31][32]

The 1999 World Cup final set the original record for largest US television audience for a women's soccer match with 18 million viewers on average[33][34] and was the most viewed English-language US broadcast of any soccer match until the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup Final between the United States and Japan.[35]

The 2015 Women's World Cup Final between the USA and Japan was the most watched soccer match – men's or women's – in American broadcast history.[36] It averaged 23 million viewers and higher ratings than the NBA finals and the Stanley Cup finals.[37][36] The final was also the most watched US-Spanish language broadcast of a FIFA Women's World Cup match in history.

Overall, there were over 750 million viewers for the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup, making it the most watched Women's World Cup in history. The FIFA Women's World Cup is now the second most watched FIFA tournament, with only the men's FIFA World Cup attracting more viewership.[38]

Attendance[edit]

The 1999 World Cup final, in which the USA defeated China, set a world attendance record for a women's sporting event of 90,185 in a sellout at the Rose Bowl in California.[39] The record for Olympic women's soccer attendance was set by the 2012 Olympic final between the USWNT and Japan, with 80,023 spectators at Wembley Stadium.[40]

Coaching staff[edit]

Role Name Start date
Head coach United States Jill Ellis May 2014
Assistant coach Sweden Tony Gustavsson Jun 2014
Goalkeeper coach England Graeme Abel Mar 2015
Fitness Coach England Dawn Scott Feb 2011

Source[1]

Team[edit]

Current squad[edit]

The following players were called up for the friendly against  Romania on November 13, 2016.[41]

Caps and goals are current as of November 13, 2016 after match against  Romania.

0#0 Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club
24 1GK Ashlyn Harris (1985-10-19) October 19, 1985 (age 31) 11 0 United States Orlando Pride
1 1GK Alyssa Naeher (1988-04-20) April 20, 1988 (age 28) 10 0 United States Chicago Red Stars

8 2DF Julie Johnston (1992-04-06) April 6, 1992 (age 24) 45 8 United States Chicago Red Stars
11 2DF Ali Krieger (1984-07-28) July 28, 1984 (age 32) 96 1 United States Orlando Pride
22 2DF Emily Menges (1992-07-28) July 28, 1992 (age 24) 0 0 United States Portland Thorns FC
5 2DF Kelley O'Hara (1988-08-04) August 4, 1988 (age 28) 91 2 United States Sky Blue FC
4 2DF Becky Sauerbrunn (captain) (1985-06-06) June 6, 1985 (age 31) 119 0 United States FC Kansas City
2 2DF Casey Short (1990-08-23) August 23, 1990 (age 26) 4 0 United States Chicago Red Stars

6 3MF Morgan Brian (1993-02-26) February 26, 1993 (age 23) 63 6 United States Houston Dash
18 3MF Kristen Edmonds (1987-05-22) May 22, 1987 (age 29) 0 0 United States Orlando Pride
17 3MF Tobin Heath (1988-05-29) May 29, 1988 (age 28) 128 18 United States Portland Thorns FC
9 3MF Lindsey Horan (1994-05-26) May 26, 1994 (age 22) 30 3 United States Portland Thorns FC
20 3MF Allie Long (1987-08-13) August 13, 1987 (age 29) 20 3 United States Portland Thorns FC
3 3MF Samantha Mewis (1992-10-09) October 9, 1992 (age 24) 18 4 United States Western New York Flash
15 3MF Megan Rapinoe (1985-07-05) July 5, 1985 (age 31) 117 31 United States Seattle Reign FC
12 3MF Andi Sullivan (1995-12-20) December 20, 1995 (age 20) 4 0 United States Stanford Cardinal

19 4FW Crystal Dunn (1992-07-03) July 3, 1992 (age 24) 45 18 United States Washington Spirit
21 4FW Jessica McDonald (1988-02-28) February 28, 1988 (age 28) 1 0 United States Western New York Flash
13 4FW Alex Morgan (1989-07-02) July 2, 1989 (age 27) 120 73 United States Orlando Pride
7 4FW Kealia Ohai (1992-01-31) January 31, 1992 (age 24) 3 1 United States Houston Dash
23 4FW Christen Press (1988-12-29) December 29, 1988 (age 27) 80 41 United States Chicago Red Stars
16 4FW Lynn Williams (1993-05-21) May 21, 1993 (age 23) 4 1 United States Western New York Flash

Recent call-ups[edit]

The following players were named to a squad in the last twelve months.

Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club Latest call-up
GK Adrianna Franch (1990-11-12) November 12, 1990 (age 26) 0 0 United States Portland Thorns FC v.  Romania; November 10, 2016
GK Jane Campbell (1995-02-17) February 17, 1995 (age 21) 0 0 United States Stanford Cardinal v.   Switzerland; October 19, 2016
GK Hope Solo SUS (1981-07-30) July 30, 1981 (age 35) 202 0 Unattached 2016 Summer Olympics, August 2016

DF Abby Dahlkemper (1993-05-13) May 13, 1993 (age 23) 2 0 United States Western New York Flash v.  Romania; November 10, 2016
DF Jaelene Hinkle (1993-05-28) May 28, 1993 (age 23) 8 0 United States Western New York Flash v.  Romania; November 10, 2016 PRE
DF Meghan Klingenberg (1988-08-02) August 2, 1988 (age 28) 70 3 United States Portland Thorns FC v.  Romania; November 10, 2016 PRE
DF Arin Gilliland (1992-12-25) December 25, 1992 (age 23) 0 0 United States Chicago Red Stars v.   Switzerland; October 23, 2016
DF Merritt Mathias (1990-07-02) July 2, 1990 (age 26) 0 0 United States Seattle Reign FC v.   Switzerland; October 23, 2016
DF Emily Sonnett (1993-11-25) November 25, 1993 (age 23) 12 0 United States Portland Thorns FC v.   Switzerland; October 23, 2016
DF Whitney Engen (1987-11-28) November 28, 1987 (age 29) 40 4 United States Boston Breakers v.  Netherlands; September 18, 2016
DF Gina Lewandowski (1985-04-13) April 13, 1985 (age 31) 1 0 Germany FC Bayern Munich v.  South Africa; July 9, 2016
DF Christie Rampone (1975-06-24) June 24, 1975 (age 41) 311 4 United States Sky Blue FC v.  Japan; June 2, 2016 PRE
DF Lauren Barnes (1989-05-31) May 31, 1989 (age 27) 0 0 United States Seattle Reign FC 2016 SheBelieves Cup, March 2016

MF Danielle Colaprico (1993-05-06) May 6, 1993 (age 23) 0 0 United States Chicago Red Stars v.   Switzerland; October 23, 2016
MF Carli Lloyd (captain) (1982-07-16) July 16, 1982 (age 34) 232 96 United States Houston Dash v.   Switzerland; October 23, 2016
MF Heather O'Reilly RET (1985-01-02) January 2, 1985 (age 31) 231 47 United States FC Kansas City v.  Thailand; September 15, 2016
MF Rose Lavelle (1995-05-14) May 14, 1995 (age 21) 0 0 United States Wisconsin Badgers v.  Japan; June 5, 2016

FW Shea Groom (1993-03-04) March 4, 1993 (age 23) 0 0 United States FC Kansas City v.   Switzerland; October 23, 2016
FW Ashley Hatch (1995-05-25) May 25, 1995 (age 21) 1 0 United States Brigham Young Cougars v.   Switzerland; October 23, 2016
FW Mallory Pugh (1998-04-29) April 29, 1998 (age 18) 17 4 United States Real Colorado v.  Thailand; September 15, 2016 PRE
FW Ashley Sanchez (1999-03-16) March 16, 1999 (age 17) 0 0 United States So Cal Blues v.  Colombia; April 6, 2016 PRE
FW Stephanie McCaffrey (1993-02-18) February 18, 1993 (age 23) 6 1 United States Chicago Red Stars CONCACAF Olympic Qualifying, February 2016
FW Sydney Leroux MAT (1990-05-07) May 7, 1990 (age 26) 75 35 United States FC Kansas City v.  Republic of Ireland; January 23, 2016
FW Amy Rodriguez MAT (1987-02-17) February 17, 1987 (age 29) 129 30 United States FC Kansas City v.  China PR; December 16, 2015
FW Abby Wambach (1980-06-02) June 2, 1980 (age 36) 256 184 Retired v.  China PR; December 16, 2015

Notes:

  • MAT = Maternity leave
  • PRE = Preliminary squad
  • RET = Retired from the USWNT
  • SUS = Suspended

Recent schedule and results[edit]

2015[edit]

The following is a list of matches in 2015

Further information: 2015 in American soccer

2016[edit]

The following is a list of matches in 2016, as well as any future matches that have been scheduled.

Further information: 2016 in American soccer

2017[edit]

Further information: 2017 in American soccer


Competitive record[edit]

For results in minor tournaments, see the History of the United States women's national soccer team

The two highest-profile tournaments that the USWNT participates in are the quadrenniel FIFA Women's World Cup and the Summer Olympics.

World Cup[edit]

The team has participated in every World Cup through 2015 and won a medal in each.

Year Result Matches Wins Draws Losses GF GA Coach
China 1991 Champion 6 6 0 0 25 5 Anson Dorrance
Sweden 1995 Third Place 6 4 1 1 15 5 Tony DiCicco
United States 1999 Champion 6 5 1 0 18 3 Tony DiCicco
United States 2003 Third Place 6 5 0 1 15 5 April Heinrichs
China 2007 Third Place 6 4 1 1 12 7 Greg Ryan
Germany 2011 Runner-up 6 3 2 1 13 7 Pia Sundhage
Canada 2015 Champion 7 6 1 0 14 3 Jill Ellis
Total 3/7 43 33 6 4 112 35

Olympic Games[edit]

The team has participated in every Olympics tournament through 2016 and won a medal in each until 2016, when they were eliminated in the quarter-finals on a penalty shootout loss against Sweden.

Year Result Matches Wins Draws Losses GF GA Coach
United States 1996 Champion 5 4 1 0 9 3 Tony DiCicco[42]
Australia 2000 Runner-up 5 3 1 1 9 5 April Heinrichs
Greece 2004 Champion 6 5 1 0 12 4 April Heinrichs
China 2008 Champion 6 5 0 1 12 5 Pia Sundhage[43]
United Kingdom 2012 Champion 6 6 0 0 16 6 Pia Sundhage
Brazil 2016 Quarterfinals 4 2 2 0 6 3 Jill Ellis
Total 4/6 33 26 5 2 63 25

Player records[edit]

Active players in bold. Statistics as of November 13, 2016

The women's national team boasts the first six players in the history of the game to have earned 200 caps.[citation needed] These players have since been joined in the 200-cap club by several players from other national teams. as well as by five more Americans: Kate Markgraf, Abby Wambach, Heather O'Reilly, Carli Lloyd and Hope Solo. Kristine Lilly and Christie Rampone are the only players to earn more than 300 caps.

In March 2004, two stars, Mia Hamm and Michelle Akers were the only two women and the only two Americans named to the FIFA 100, a list of the 125 greatest living soccer players chosen by Pelé as part of FIFA's centenary observances.

The USWNT All-Time Best XI was chosen In December 2013 by the United States Soccer Federation:

  • Goalie: Brianna Scurry;
  • Defenders: Brandi Chastain, Carla Overbeck, Christie Rampone, Joy Fawcett;
  • Midfielders: Kristine Lilly, Michelle Akers, Julie Foudy;
  • Forwards: Mia Hamm, Abby Wambach, Alex Morgan[44]

Most capped players[edit]

Rank Player Caps Goals Years
1 Kristine Lilly 354 130 1987–2010
2 Christie Rampone 311 4 1997–2015
3 Mia Hamm 276 158 1987–2004
4 Julie Foudy 274 45 1988–2004
5 Abby Wambach 256 184 2001–2015
6 Joy Fawcett 241 27 1987–2004
7 Carli Lloyd 232 96 2005–
8 Heather O'Reilly 231 47 2002–2016
9 Tiffeny Milbrett 206 100 1991–2005
10 Hope Solo 202 0 2000–

Source[45]

Top scorers[edit]

Rank Player Caps Goals Years Avg
1 Abby Wambach 256 184 2001–2015 0.72
2 Mia Hamm 276 158 1987–2004 0.57
3 Kristine Lilly 354 130 1987–2010 0.37
4 Michelle Akers 155 107 1985–2000 0.69
5 Tiffeny Milbrett 206 100 1991–2005 0.49
6 Carli Lloyd 232 96 2005– 0.41
7 Cindy Parlow 158 75 1996–2004 0.47
8 Alex Morgan 120 73 2010– 0.61
9 Shannon MacMillan 176 60 1993–2005 0.34
10 Carin Jennings-Gabarra 119 56 1987–1996 0.47

Source[45]

Most assists[edit]

Rank Player Caps Assists Years Avg
1 Mia Hamm 276 145 1987–2004 0.53
2 Kristine Lilly 354 106 1987–2010 0.30
3 Abby Wambach 256 73 2001–2015 0.29
4 Tiffeny Milbrett 206 64 1991–2005 0.31
5 Julie Foudy 274 55 1988–2004 0.20
Heather O'Reilly 231 55 2002–2016 0.23
7 Shannon MacMillan 177 50 1993–2005 0.28
8 Carli Lloyd 232 49 2005– 0.21
9 Carin Jennings-Gabarra 119 48 1987–1996 0.40
10 Aly Wagner 131 42 1998–2008 0.32

Source[45] Updated to January 8, 2016

Captains[edit]

Years as captain Player Caps Goals USWNT
career
1985 Denise Bender[46] 4 0 1985
1986–1987 Emily Pickering[47] 15 2 1985–1992
1988–1991 Lori Henry 39 3 1985–1991
1991 April Heinrichs[48] 46 35 1986–1991
1993–2000 Carla Overbeck[49] 170 4 1988–2000
2000–2004 Julie Foudy[50] 274 45 1987–2004
2000–2004 Joy Fawcett 241 27 1987–2004
2004–2008 Kristine Lilly 354 130 1987–2010
2008–2015 Christie Rampone 311 4 1997–2015
2016– Carli Lloyd 232 96 2005 –
2016– Becky Sauerbrunn 119 0 2008–

Most goals in a match[edit]

The record for most goals scored in a match by a member of the USWNT is five, which has been accomplished by seven players.

Player Date Opponent Location Competition Line-up
Brandi Chastain April 18, 1991[51] Mexico Mexico[51] Port-au-Prince, Haiti World Cup Qualifying Tournament Substitute
Michelle Akers November 24, 1991[51] Chinese Taipei Chinese Taipei[51] Foshan, China 1991 FIFA World Cup Starting
Tiffeny Milbrett November 2, 2002[51] Panama Panama[51] Seattle, United States 2002 CONCACAF Gold Cup Starting
Abby Wambach October 23, 2004[51] Republic of Ireland Republic of Ireland[51] Houston, United States International Friendly Starting
Amy Rodriguez January 20, 2012[51] Dominican Republic Dominican Republic[51] Vancouver, Canada 2012 Olympic Qualifying Tournament Substitute (46')
Sydney Leroux January 22, 2012[51] Guatemala Guatemala[51] Vancouver, Canada 2012 Olympic Qualifying Tournament Substitute (46')
Crystal Dunn February 15, 2016[51] Puerto Rico Puerto Rico[51] Frisco, United States 2016 Olympic Qualifying Tournament Starting

Head coaching history[edit]

Name Years Matches Won Tied Lost Win % Pts÷M World Cup Olympics
Republic of Ireland United States Ryan, MikeMike Ryan 1985 4 0 1 3 .125 0.25 0 0
United States Dorrance, AnsonAnson Dorrance 1986–1994 93 66 5 22 .737 2.18 3.Gold medal icon (G initial).svg 0.
United States DiCicco, TonyTony DiCicco 1994–1999 119 103 8 8 .899 2.66 4.Bronze medal icon (B initial).svg Gold medal icon (G initial).svg 3.Gold medal icon (G initial).svg
United States Gregg, LaurenLauren Gregg 1997, 2000 3 2 1 0 .833 2.33
United States Heinrichs, AprilApril Heinrichs 2000–2004 124 87 20 17 .782 2.27 1.Bronze medal icon (B initial).svg 5.Silver medal icon (S initial).svg Gold medal icon (G initial).svg
United States Ryan, GregGreg Ryan 2005–2007 55 45 9 1 .900 2.62 1.Bronze medal icon (B initial).svg 0
Sweden Sundhage, PiaPia Sundhage 2007–2012 107 91 10 6 .897 2.64 2.Silver medal icon (S initial).svg 6.Gold medal icon (G initial).svg Gold medal icon (G initial).svg
Scotland Sermanni, TomTom Sermanni 2013–2014 23 17 4 2 .826 2.39 0 0
EnglandUnited States Ellis, JillJill Ellis 2014.2012, 2014–present 73 58 13 3 .883 2.56 3.Gold medal icon (G initial).svg 0.1. 5th
Totals 601 469 70 62 .838 2.45
Statistics as of November 13, 2016

Honors[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

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  63. ^ Tournoi International Feminin 1995 rsssf.com. Retrieved October 12, 2013.
  64. ^ Chiquita Cup 1994 rsssf.com. Retrieved October 12, 2013.
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  66. ^ Goodwill Games 1998 rsssf.com. Retrieved October 12, 2013.
  67. ^ Colombus Cup 1993 rsssf.com. Retrieved October 12, 2013.

External links[edit]

Sporting positions
Preceded by
Inaugural champions
FIFA Women's World Cup champions
1991 (first title)
Succeeded by
1995 Norway 
Preceded by
1995 Norway 
FIFA Women's World Cup champions
1999 (second title)
Succeeded by
2003 Germany 
Preceded by
2011 Japan 
FIFA Women's World Cup champions
2015 (third title)
Succeeded by
Incumbent
Preceded by
Inaugural champions
Olympic champions
1996 (first title)
Succeeded by
2000 Norway 
Preceded by
2000 Norway 
Olympic champions
2004 (second title)
2008 (third title)
2012 (fourth title)
Succeeded by
2016 Germany 
Preceded by
Inaugural champions
CONCACAF women's champions
1991 (first title)
1993 (second title)
1994 (third title)
Succeeded by
1998 Canada 
Preceded by
1998 Canada 
As CONCACAF champions
CONCACAF Women's Gold Cup champions
2000 (fourth title)
2002 (fifth title)
2006 (sixth title)
Succeeded by
2010 Canada 
Preceded by
2010 Canada 
CONCACAF Women's Gold Cup champions
2014 (seventh title)
Succeeded by
Incumbent