Steve Swetonic

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Steve Swetonic
Pitcher
Born: (1903-08-13)August 13, 1903
Mount Pleasant, Pennsylvania
Died: April 22, 1974(1974-04-22) (aged 70)
Canonsburg, Pennsylvania
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
April 17, 1929 for the Pittsburgh Pirates
Last MLB appearance
May 19, 1935 for the Pittsburgh Pirates
Career statistics
Win–loss record 37–36
Strikeouts 154
Earned run average 3.81
Teams

Stephen Albert Swetonic (August 13, 1903 – April 22, 1974) was a pitcher in Major League Baseball, who played his entire career for the Pittsburgh Pirates from 1929 through 1935. Swetonic batted and threw right-handed. He was born in Mount Pleasant, Pennsylvania and was of Serbian descent.

Swetonic provided a solid support in Pirates' pitching staffs of the early 1930s that included Larry French, Burleigh Grimes, Waite Hoyt, and Ray Kremer. His most productive season came in 1932, when he went 11–6 with a career-high 2.82 ERA and tied for the National League lead with four shutouts. In 1933 he recorded career-numbers in wins (12), starts (21), and innings pitched (164 ⅔ ). His career ended prematurily at the age of 28 because of a chronic sore arm.

Swetonic went to spring training with the Boston Braves in 1934 but did not play in the regular season.[1] In a March 24 game against the Philadelphia Athletics, in St. Petersburg, Florida, he yielded four runs in the first inning.[2] In March 1935, Swetonic was in spring training with the New York Giants team in Miami Beach, Florida. He tossed the final three innings of an intrasquad game between teams captained by Carl Hubbell and Freddie Fitzsimmons on February 28.[3]

In a five-season career, Swetonic posted a 37–36 record with 154 strikeouts and a 3.81 ERA in 595 ⅓ innings. He died in Canonsburg, Pennsylvania, at age 70.

Fact[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Sports of the Times, None But The Braves, New York Times, March 24, 1934, pg. 11.
  2. ^ Athletics Score, 9 - 2, New York Times, March 25, 1934, pg. S8.
  3. ^ Parmalee Is Busy Trying Forkball, New York Times, March 1, 1935, pg. 23.

External links[edit]