Swearingen SX-300

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Swearingen SX-300
SwearingenSX-300Landing.jpg
Role Homebuilt aircraft
National origin United States of America
Designer Ed Swearingen
First flight 1 July 1984[1]
Unit cost
$37,500 for kit minus engine and avionics in 1986
SX-300 on the ramp
Rear of SX-300 with canopy open.

A high-performance homebuilt aircraft featuring two seats and developed by Ed Swearingen (1925 - 2014) of San Antonio, Texas during the 1980s.[2] The aircraft was offered as a kit, but the kit was not a comprehensive kit like contemporary designs and its construction was beyond the abilities of the average amateur aircraft builder.[3] The plane featured a 300 horsepower (220 kW) six-cylinder engine. Plans have been made to revive the plane and offer it as a quick-build kit, but there is no current kit being offered.

There are eight known crashes of SX-300 aircraft, ten deaths.

Specifications (Swearingen SX-300)[edit]

Data from Flying[2]

General characteristics

  • Capacity: 2
  • Length: 21 ft 2 in (6.45 m)
  • Wingspan: 24 ft 4 in (7.42 m)
  • Height: 7 ft 5 in (2.26 m)
  • Wing area: 70.73 sq ft (6.571 m2)
  • Empty weight: 1,400 lb (635 kg)
  • Max takeoff weight: 2,200 lb (998 kg)
  • Fuel capacity: 360 lbs
  • Powerplant: 1 × Lycoming IO-540 6-cyl. air-cooled horizontally-opposed piston engine, 300 hp (220 kW)
  • Propellers: 3-bladed

Performance

  • Cruise speed: 208 kn; 385 km/h (239 mph)
  • Stall speed: 57 kn; 106 km/h (66 mph)

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Moll, Nigel (October 1984). "Swearingen kit-built flies". Reporting Points. Flying. Vol. 111 no. 10. Ziff Davis. p. 84. ISSN 0015-4806. Retrieved 16 August 2016 – via Google Books. 
  2. ^ a b Collins, Richard L. (January 1984). "SX300". Features. Flying. Vol. 111 no. 1. Ziff Davis. pp. 51–54. ISSN 0015-4806. Retrieved 16 August 2016 – via Google Books. 
  3. ^ Campbell, Jim (August 1986). "Hot Wings". Aviation. Popular Mechanics. Vol. 163 no. 8. Hearst Corporation. pp. 76–79. ISSN 0032-4558. Retrieved 16 August 2016 – via Google Books. 

External links[edit]