TUXIS Parliament of Alberta

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TUXIS Parliament of Alberta TUXIS.JPG
MottoLife is not a goblet to be drained but is a measure to be filled
Formation1920
Premier
Matthew Boonstra
Leader of the Opposition
Yuvraj Singh
Deputy Premier
Cassey Fallis
Alternate Leader of the Opposition
Simran Ghotra
AffiliationsWestern Canada Youth Parliament
Websitewww.tuxisyp.com

The TUXIS Parliament of Alberta (“TUXIS”) is one of a number of provincial model youth parliaments that has its origins in the "boys work" movement of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. TUXIS originally met under the name “Alberta Older Boy's Parliament”. The Alberta Older Boy's Parliament added “TUXIS” to its name in 1932[1]. “TUXIS” stands for “Training for Service, with Christ (represented with an 'X' for the Greek letter 'chi') in the centre, and you and I on either side, with no-one but Christ between us”.[2] An alternative interpretation is "Training Under Christ In Service." It was the last of these youth parliaments to retain its “TUXIS” appellation and maintain its Christian character, but has since become a spiritual, but non-denominational organization.[3] Its membership is not restricted on the basis of religion or personal beliefs[4].

Overview[edit]

The central focus of the organization is its parliamentary program. The main parliamentary session occurs during the last week of December[5], which determines the annual agenda of events. This includes five conferences, usually held in February, March, May, September and November and up to two "Front Bench Retreats". These conferences help plan the upcoming session and have other activities meeting the objectives of the organization.

The parliament's goals have evolved from the TUXIS "four-fold" program to develop the mental, physical, social and spiritual well-being of its members and all youth. TUXIS is a non-denominational spiritual youth Parliament[6] which recently reaffirmed its non-exclusionary spiritual foundation. TUXIS believes that exposure to different points of view encourages tolerance of varying interpretations of religion, faith, and spirituality. Each session has a theme developed by the "Ministry of Devotions." Although theme discussions center on issues of spiritual living important to youth, being religious is not a pre-requisite to attending a session or conference of the Parliament; the Parliament is non-exclusionary and invites all Alberta youth to attend.

Activities[edit]

TUXIS holds an annual session from December 26 to 31[7]. The focus of session is the parliamentary sittings where the members learn parliamentary procedure and debate legislation on topics of interest[8]. In addition to the parliamentary procedure and debating activities, members attending the annual session participate in various social action and devotional events.

TUXIS also holds weekend conferences throughout the year[9], usually in February, March, May, September, and November. At each of these conferences, Friday is spent meeting new members and participating in membership, social action, and devotion activities. These include "ice breakers" and fun "energizers." Social action and devotions are more serious events which involve group discussions. Saturday mornings include a Front Bench Meeting designed to update the members on the business of Parliament, make decisions about the direction of the organization and plan for session. The rest of the day is spent with the membership, social action and devotions activities, as well as recreational activities and free time. Sunday activities include church services and clean up.

TUXIS is a founding member of the Western Canada Youth Parliament[10]. It was also a founding member and participant in the now-defunct Youth Parliament of Canada/Parlement jeunesse du Canada.[11]

Organizational structure[edit]

The Executive Committee consists of the Premier, the Leader of the Opposition, the Deputy Premier, and the Alternate Leader of the Opposition[12]. They are elected at Session by the members of the parliament and serve a one year term. The Executive Committee is colloquially referred to as the "Front Four" and they run the parliament by appointing the Front Bench: Ministers for the Cabinet and Deputies for the Shadow Cabinet[13]. The current Executive Committee, elected at the 99th Session of the TUXIS Parliament, is Carly Russell as Premier, Matthew Boonstra as Leader of the Opposition, Yuvraj Singh as Deputy Premier, and Simranpreet Ghotra as the Alternate Leader of the Opposition[14].

The current Front Bench is:

Cabinet:

  • Provincial Secretary: Joel Westman
  • Minister of Finance - Sarah Clark
  • Minister of Programming - Katie Choy
  • Minister of Devotions: Caroline Mancenido
  • Minister of Education - Alexis Holmgren

[15]

History[edit]

The first Session of the Older Boys' Parliament of Alberta was first held in the Legislative Chamber of the Provincial Government in Edmonton, from December 28 to 30, 1920. The Mayor of Edmonton, D.M. Duggan, acted as Lieutenant Governor. Armour Ford was elected as the first Speaker. The first Premier was Edward Hunter Gowan. The Leader of the Opposition was James Robin Davidson[16].

Like many of the other Canadian Youth Parliaments, TUXIS was sponsored by the Boys’ Work Board of the provincial Religious Education Council (“REC”)[17]. The REC was a coalition of religious organizations, the most significant of which was the United Church). The REC of Alberta ceased to exist in 1962[18]. As a result, the TUXIS and Older Boy's Parliament of Alberta Alumni Society was formed. The members of this Society now provide sponsorship, including financial backing and continuity, of TUXIS[19].

The 60th Session of the Parliament approved a resolution inviting young women to attend the Parliament and share in the companionship of TUXIS. This same year also approved a resolution to change the name from "TUXIS and Older Boys' Parliament of Alberta" to "TUXIS Parliament of Alberta."[20] Young women first attended the 62nd Session in 1981[21] at Red Deer and soon entered into the leadership when LaVonne Rosvick was elected Premier for the 67th Session[22].

TUXIS celebrated its ninetieth Session in December 2009. Unlike most other Canadian Youth Parliaments founded during the same time, TUXIS met continuously throughout the Great Depression and World War II. As a result, TUXIS has the longest uninterrupted history of annual sessions of any youth parliament in Canada[23].

Notable alumni[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "About | TUXIS Parliament of Alberta | Canada". TUXIS Parliament. Retrieved 2019-03-17.
  2. ^ "About | TUXIS Parliament of Alberta | Canada". TUXIS Parliament. Retrieved 2019-03-17.
  3. ^ "About | TUXIS Parliament of Alberta | Canada". TUXIS Parliament. Retrieved 2019-03-17.
  4. ^ "About | TUXIS Parliament of Alberta | Canada". TUXIS Parliament. Retrieved 2019-03-17.
  5. ^ "Events | TUXIS Parliament of Alberta | Canada". TUXIS Parliament. Retrieved 2019-03-17.
  6. ^ "About | TUXIS Parliament of Alberta | Canada". TUXIS Parliament. Retrieved 2019-03-17.
  7. ^ "Session | TUXIS Parliament of Alberta | Canada". TUXIS Parliament. Retrieved 2019-05-14.
  8. ^ "Session | TUXIS Parliament of Alberta | Canada". TUXIS Parliament. Retrieved 2019-05-14.
  9. ^ "Events | TUXIS Parliament of Alberta | Canada". TUXIS Parliament. Retrieved 2019-03-17.
  10. ^ "Western Canada Youth Parliament | TUXIS Parliament of Alberta | Canada". TUXIS Parliament. Retrieved 2019-05-14.
  11. ^ http://www.revparl.ca/english/issue.asp?param=104&art=519
  12. ^ "Parliament | TUXIS Parliament of Alberta | Canada". TUXIS Parliament. Retrieved 2019-03-17.
  13. ^ "Parliament | TUXIS Parliament of Alberta | Canada". TUXIS Parliament. Retrieved 2019-03-17.
  14. ^ "Parliament | TUXIS Parliament of Alberta | Canada". TUXIS Parliament. Retrieved 2019-03-17.
  15. ^ "Parliament | TUXIS Parliament of Alberta | Canada". TUXIS Parliament. Retrieved 2019-03-17.
  16. ^ "History | TUXIS Parliament of Alberta | Canada". TUXIS Parliament. Retrieved 2019-05-14.
  17. ^ "History | TUXIS Parliament of Alberta | Canada". TUXIS Parliament. Retrieved 2019-05-14.
  18. ^ "History | TUXIS Parliament of Alberta | Canada". TUXIS Parliament. Retrieved 2019-05-14.
  19. ^ "History | TUXIS Parliament of Alberta | Canada". TUXIS Parliament. Retrieved 2019-05-14.
  20. ^ "History | TUXIS Parliament of Alberta | Canada". TUXIS Parliament. Retrieved 2019-05-14.
  21. ^ http://www.revparl.ca/english/issue.asp?param=104&art=519
  22. ^ "History | TUXIS Parliament of Alberta | Canada". TUXIS Parliament. Retrieved 2019-05-14.
  23. ^ "Alberta's oldest youth parliament celebrates 100 years of training leaders |". Edmonton Journal. Retrieved 2019-07-14.
  24. ^ http://www.meridianbooster.com/ArticleDisplay.aspx?archive=true&e=1369015
  25. ^ http://www.meridianbooster.com/ArticleDisplay.aspx?archive=true&e=1369015
  26. ^ http://www.meridianbooster.com/ArticleDisplay.aspx?archive=true&e=1369015
  27. ^ http://www.meridianbooster.com/ArticleDisplay.aspx?archive=true&e=1369015
  28. ^ http://alberta.ca/release.cfm?xID=38715A2EE1F52-FAF2-8C25-E7BFDCBCA2A99974
  29. ^ https://www.assembly.ab.ca/net/index.aspx?p=mla_bio&rnumber=84&leg=29

External links[edit]