National Stadium, Ta' Qali

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National Stadium
Ta' Qali, Stadium Nazzjonali
Malta TaQali.JPG
Full name National Stadium, Ta' Qali
Location Malta Ta' Qali, Attard, Malta
Coordinates 35°53′41.51″N 14°24′55.34″E / 35.8948639°N 14.4153722°E / 35.8948639; 14.4153722Coordinates: 35°53′41.51″N 14°24′55.34″E / 35.8948639°N 14.4153722°E / 35.8948639; 14.4153722
Owner Government of Malta
Operator Malta Football Association
Executive suites 6
Capacity 16,997[1]
Record attendance 35,102[2]
Malta 2–3 West Germany
1986 World Cup Qualifier
16 December 1984
Field size 105 m × 68 m (344 ft × 223 ft) [3]
Surface Hybrid grass
Construction
Opened 1981
Renovated 2002
Tenants
Malta national football team
Maltese Premier League

The National Stadium (Maltese: il-Grawnd Nazzjonali Ta' Qali), locally also referred to as Ta' Qali, is a stadium located in Ta' Qali, Malta. The stadium, which also contains the headquarters of the Malta Football Association, seats 16,997 people and is, by far, the largest stadium in the country. It serves as the national football stadium of Malta and is the home stadium of the Malta national football team. The stadium, together with three other stadiums, also hosts the Maltese Premier League and some of the matches of the Maltese FA Trophy, including the final. The stadium is now set to host the Junior Eurovision Song Contest 2019.

History[edit]

Background and early years[edit]

Although officially the new stadium was inaugurated on 6 December 1981 with a Maltese Premier League encounter between Zurrieq and Senglea, certain records suggest that the stadium was already up and running by May 1981. Indeed, newspapers extracts indicate that the stadium hosted the final of the first ever national championship organised by the now defunct Malta Football Federation (not to be mixed with the Malta Football Association, which at that time was known as the Main Football Association) between Valletta Vanguards FC and Birkirkara St. Joseph Sports Club on 3 May 1981.[4]

The highest ever attendance at the Stadium was on during a 1986 World Cup Qualifier encounter between Malta and West Germany played on 16 December 1984, when 35,102 people turned up to watch Malta narrowly lose to the runners up of the previous World Cup.[2]

The Millennium Stand[edit]

Malta - Attard - Ta' Qali National Stadium 14 ies.jpg

On 3 September, 2002, the Malta Football Association inaugurated the Millennium Stand.[5] The Millennium Stand replaced the 5,000 seater East Stand, which had been declared as a dangerous structure for a number of years by then and hence had to be demolished. The construction of the Millennium Stand, which costed 3.5 million Maltese lira, Malta's currency before the introduction of the Euro, was regarded as the "biggest infrastructural project ever undertaken by the Malta Football Association" whereas the stand itself has been described as "the jewel in the Malta FA's crown".[5][6]

Pitch resurfacing[edit]

In 2016, the Maltese Football Association announced a €1.5 million project to replace the old grass surface with a modern hybrid grass surface, with the latter having been in service for 35 years. The project was conducted by SIS Pitches who are renowned for other works such as the Vodafone Arena and iPro Stadium. The expenses were partly financed by UEFA and FIFA, with the rest being covered by the MFA.

Future[edit]

In July 2017, during the annual general meeting, the Malta Football Association announced five projects were announced by the association. Two of the these projects, which also include the construction of new futsal hall and a parking adjacent to the Enclosure (West Stand), entail the re-development of the North and South Stands.[7]. A short clip shared by the association on its Facebook page suggests that the space behind both the goals will be removed and the two stands will be moved closer to the pitch.[8] The re-development also entails the removal of the corners, thus resulting in the stadium become an "English-style" venue. On April 1, 2018, it was revealed that the stadium would host the Junior Eurovision Song Contest 2019, making Malta the first ever country to host the contest more than twice.

Events[edit]

UEFA European Under-17 Championship[edit]

The National Stadium was Malta's main venue during its hosting of the 2014 UEFA European Under-17 Championship. The stadium hosted 7 matches in all, including the opening ceremony, 3 group stage games, the semi-finals and the final. 9,422[9] people turned up to watch England win the championship by beating the Netherlands on penalties.[10]

Games of the Small States of Europe[edit]

The Xth edition of the Games of the Small States of Europe was held in Malta and the National Stadium was chosen to hold the Opening Ceremony.[11] The Opening Ceremony was spectacular as colour, dance and fireworks made the evening a memorable one for those present at the stadium.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Malta-England... Tickets for local fans sell out in 10 days". MFA. Retrieved 22 June 2018. 
  2. ^ a b "Malta national football team lost to West Germany 2:3, 16 December 1984". Eu-football.info. Retrieved 22 June 2018. 
  3. ^ "The grass is greener at the National Stadium". Timesofmalta.com. Retrieved 22 June 2018. 
  4. ^ "BIRKIRKARA ST JOSEPH AT TA' QALI NATIONAL STADIUM'S INAUGURAL MATCH". Birkirkara St.Joseph Sports Club. Retrieved 22 June 2018. 
  5. ^ a b "Millennium Stand inaugurated". Timesofmalta.com. Retrieved 22 June 2018. 
  6. ^ "Millions for the millennium stand". Timesofmalta.com. Retrieved 22 June 2018. 
  7. ^ "MFA teams up with Government to build football school". MFA. Retrieved 22 June 2018. 
  8. ^ "Malta Football Association - 1900". Facebook.com. Retrieved 22 June 2018. 
  9. ^ "Netherlands U17 vs. England U17 - 21 May 2014 - Soccerway". int.soccerway.com. Retrieved 22 June 2018. 
  10. ^ "England win European Under-17 Championship on penalties". Bbc.com. 21 May 2014. Retrieved 22 June 2018. 
  11. ^ "Small Nations Games open". Timesofmalta.com. Retrieved 22 June 2018. 

External links[edit]