Talk:Air–fuel ratio meter

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This page is is serious need of editing.

I'd do that if I had the time!

I wonder if this page is really needed at all? Although the answer is yes, it is needed, I think much of the current content should reside elsewhere (eg. oxygen sensors are NOT meters - meters are display devices for controllers connected to sensors, and sometimes a controller is not necessary).

So, should this page be only about AFR display devices?

Article direction[edit]

This article is suppose to be about air–fuel ratio meters. The lead of an article is suppose to be a summary of article content. This article goes from the lead, that is vague at best, to other areas without answering the question: What is an air–fuel ratio meter? After the lead we jump into Benefits of air–fuel ratio metering. A lead typically does not need to be referenced (the article only has one) as long as the content is covered in the article. Oops! I think that is missed.
Would this be correct? A meter would be any device that can give a readout of something it is connected to usually to provide diagnostic capabilities. An oxygen sensor uses voltage that corresponds to ranges that can be converted to information to determine an air–fuel ratio. This would mean that a digital multi-meter could be an air–fuel ratio meter.
From 1996, OBD II engine diagnostic scanners, that read engine sensors including oxygen sensors and codes, would also be an air–fuel ratio meter. It would seem that, if that is true, a smart phone, with a blue-tooth adapter able to read all sensors, report codes set, erase codes, and having trouble shooting capabilities like the engine diagnostic scanners, would also be an air–fuel ratio meter. Otr500 (talk) 05:36, 24 March 2016 (UTC)