Talk:Anawan Rock

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tragic haunted rock[edit]

Please add to this very stubby article -- there seems to be much more to say!

  • newenglandfolklore.blogspot.com/2010/09/spirits-of-anawan-rock.html
The Spirits of Anawan Rock - September 03, 2010
. "The tragedy occurred in August of 1676, when the Algonquin sachem Anawan and his men took refuge at the rock as King Philips' War was winding down. Metacom, aka King Philip, had been killed by the English in early August and the tide had clearly turned in favor of the colonists. As one of Metacom's supporters, Anawan knew he was next on the colonists' hit list.
. It's not clear why he chose this particularly rock for a last stand, but it could be because it's located near a swamp. The Algonquins often retreated to swampy areas in times of trouble, both for practical defensive reasons and because spirit allies like Hobbomok were more accessible in such places. Whatever the reason he went there, things didn't work out well for Anwan. He was tracked down by Captain Benjamin Church of Plymouth Colony, and surrendered on August 28 after Church promised he would not be executed.
. Unfortunately for Anawan, the Pilgrims didn't keep their word. He was beheaded, and his head displayed on a pole at Plymouth for several years.
. With such a tragic history, it's not surprising Anawan Rock is now considered to be haunted. Phantom camp fires have been seen, and voices are sometimes heard in the woods crying out "Iootash!", which means "fight on" in the local Algonquin dialect. Strange screams and shouts can also be heard in the rock's vicinity. And these aren't old ghost stories from the 1700 or 1800s - paranormal researchers claim these phenomena are still happening today.
. I got my information from Thomas D'Agostino's Haunted Massachusetts and Cheri Revai's book, which has the same name."

-71.174.188.43 (talk) 18:48, 23 January 2014 (UTC)

The Capture of Old Chief Annawan (1676)[edit]

Detailed history story availble online:

  • www.heritage-history.com/?c=read&author=sabin&book=frontier&story=annawan
BOY'S BOOK OF FRONTEIR FIGHTERS
by Edwin L. Sabin 1919
Chapter I, page 15
The Capture of Old Chief Annawan (1676)
Bold Captain Church in the Lion's Den
"Only a remnant of King Phillip's people were left at large, under two principal chiefs, Tispaquin and old Annawan. Of these chiefs Annawan was the more important; he had ranked as Phillip's head captain. In the swamp battle where Phillip was killed, his great voice had boomed through the mist of morning, calling "Iootash! Iootash!"—"Fight stoutly! Fight stoutly!" But in the mix-up he had escaped, and when the dew had dried the Captain Church scouts could not trail him....
If Captain Church had stayed at Plymouth, very likely he would have saved the life of old Annawan, whom he much admired. However, he was ordered out upon another hunt, which resulted in the surrender, this time, of Chief Tispaquin. That over with, he went to Boston; and when he returned to Plymouth from Boston he found the heads of Annawan and Tispaquin cut off and stuck up for all to see."

Are there any real sources for all these details? Are any authentic Wampanoag history sources accessible?-71.174.188.43 (talk) 19:11, 23 January 2014 (UTC)