Talk:Atmos clock

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Conventional clock[edit]

The phrase "conventional clock" is entirely imprecise. It probably means a mantel clock but no one can tell. The wiki article on mantel clocks does not state their frequency and I do not know it. But I own a grandfather clock and am looking at it as I type this. It has a frequency of 60 Hz, which is 1/30 of that of the Atmos clock. So I rewrote the sentence to be more accurate. Nick Beeson (talk) 13:11, 2 August 2012 (UTC)

I think you got your units wrong in the above comment (but the article looks correct). A frequency of 60 Hz means that the pendulum is swinging 60 times a second, or 3600 times faster than an Atmos. It would be a blur at that speed.
Here are four grandfather clocks taking 2.0 seconds for one cycle ("cycle" means swinging left-to-right then right-to-left. Some folks call a single left-to-right movement a "tick" or a "beat".):
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6xaAOnnalxo
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rXw4_GDTJMk
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ps6dPxoxe9c
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wky9XDLQ_aA
And here is an Atmos taking 60 seconds per cycle:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HYnJEJN94Rs
So yes, 30 to 1 is correct. And "Grandfather" is far better than "conventional" -- a Cuckoo Clock is a "conventional clock." Good catch.
Alas, there is another error. It says "The torsion pendulum executes only two torsional oscillations per minute", which is wrong, (one is the correct figure) while Pendulum correctly states "The time for one complete cycle, a left swing and a right swing, is called the period." --Guy Macon (talk) 15:42, 2 August 2012 (UTC)
I agree with Guy Macon. Almost every grandfather clock uses a seconds pendulum, which takes 1 second for the left-to-right swing and another 1 second for the right-to-left swing, for a total period of 2 seconds.
The videos I've seen of the Atmos (such as https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MEVvOx97R4s ) show its torsion pendulum moving "left" for about 30 seconds, and "right" for about 30 seconds, for a total period of 1 minute (60 seconds), so the 30 to 1 ratio is correct. --DavidCary (talk) 05:28, 20 April 2015 (UTC)