Talk:Congener

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I noticed that the definition of congener in reference to chemistry is unclear. The term shows up in the article on MRSA, and I followed the link here, however, it doesn't explain how a molecule can be considered similar to another based on closeness in the periodic table. Does it mean that perhaps one atom, or one element, in congener molecules differs between the two molecules but is always something within a small space on the periodic table? If not, what does it mean? 75.81.46.183 02:08, 20 December 2006 (UTC)A Random Reader

A section is needed on the linguistic use of congener. —Preceding unsigned comment added by BobSchacht (talkcontribs) 20:43, 22 April 2009 (UTC)

Congener in Alcoholic Beverages[edit]

Given the importance of this topic, I should like to suggest that a separate article be made of this. There should also be links to and from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hangover Perhaps the below links will suggest the topics importance http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/health/8416431.stm http://www.cnn.com/2009/HEALTH/12/18/booze.hangovers.congener/ Thanks, Rumjal --rumjal 06:52, 21 December 2009 (UTC) —Preceding unsigned comment added by Rumjal (talkcontribs)

Tannins and others[edit]

Congener in beverage jargon refers only to chemicals produced in fermentation. Tannins and other things found in the base ingredients are excluded unless the amount of that particular substance increases substantially (like diacetyl, which is present in some grapes, but is also a byproduct of ethanol synthesis). Also, in distilled beverages the color comes from oak barrels or caramel coloring. Made appropriate changes. Thatoneguy (talk) 19:30, 20 April 2011 (UTC)