Talk:De Moivre–Laplace theorem

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Speed of convergence?[edit]

Do we know anything about the speed of convergence? 193.224.40.254 (talk) 10:03, 1 October 2010 (UTC) Sorry, it was Koczy (talk) 10:04, 1 October 2010 (UTC)

Check the central limit theorem and Berry–Esseen theorem articles.  // stpasha »  04:02, 2 October 2010 (UTC)

Proofs and Wikipedia[edit]

Does it really make sense to put a proof into Wikipedia?

It should be sufficient to mention the relevant theorems and point to literature.

--Chire (talk) 13:39, 18 September 2013 (UTC)

no, don't touch the proof. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 86.201.147.141 (talk) 08:51, 9 April 2014 (UTC)

The proof has some gaps. For example:

- The negligibility of the elided terms of order 3 or more
- The applicability of the series for log

It is better to give a correct proof or at least indicate that this is a sketch which needs some further (not entirely trivial) work to complete. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 14.139.227.196 (talk) 16:56, 15 February 2016 (UTC)

Making the proof more accessible.[edit]

The purpose of my edits is to make this proof more accessible to high school students who have taken calculus. Most students now learn the central limit theorem but the proof in its most general form is beyond them. This proof can be somewhat better explained and more easily understood by the interested student and teacher.

The changes are simply to break the existing proof into parts and reorder the steps a bit to make it clear that the proof consists of successively applying three approximations. An important detail that has been overlooked is also dealt with at the start of the proof.

Boppajim (talk) 02:03, 26 June 2015 (UTC)