Talk:Diarrhea

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Additional sources[edit]

http://www.gatesfoundation.org/global-health/Documents/enteric-and-diarrheal-diseases-strategy.pdf

Diarrhea, sometimes spelled diarrhoea[edit]

I am not sure if I agree with the "sometimes" in the first sentence (before it was "also", changed by User:JosephSpiral). I haven't researched this in detail, but isn't diarrhea the U.S. spelling and diarrhoea the British spelling? Google gives 40 Mio hits for the first spelling and 11 Mio hits of the second spelling. So I think the word "sometimes" is misleading here? Perhaps "less frequently" would be better? EvMsmile (talk) 03:26, 6 November 2015 (UTC)

I have replaced "sometimes" with "also". EvMsmile (talk) 04:00, 23 November 2015 (UTC)
You have moved the explanation to the main body, User:Doc_James but I wonder if it isn't better to also have it mentioned in the first sentence? Compare how we've done it here: Feces. I think it's useful to have it in the lead which one is US and which one is UK English, isn't it? Or perhaps there is a guideline about it somewhere? EvMsmile (talk) 02:28, 26 February 2016 (UTC)
There are different spellings yes. We in Canada use a mix of the two. Who uses what spelling does not belong in the first sentence IMO. Doc James (talk · contribs · email) 04:16, 26 February 2016 (UTC)
there must be lots of other example articles where the same problem arose, perhaps we can compare. The ones I saw so far do seem to mention who uses which spelling (like the one on feces. For non-English speakers this is not obvious. E.g. In German there is usually only one spelling possible. So if it just says "also spelled as" then it leaves me wondering "when is it spelled in which way?", or "would the same publication use both spellings side by side?", "is one used more by doctors and one more by lay persons"? EvMsmile (talk) 10:16, 26 February 2016 (UTC)
IMO those details belong in the body of the article. People often want to put a lot of etymology, pronunciation, and spelling stuff in the first sentence. This makes it harder and harder to read. Doc James (talk · contribs · email) 00:46, 27 February 2016 (UTC)

This article refers the reader to another article which redirects back to here.[edit]

I noticed that this article, in two sections, says "See also: Diarrhea in developing regions" but that page in question simply redirects back to Diarrhea. What is going on? 3 days ago it appears that the other page was blanked and then set to redirect to here, did any information get lost in the process? Can someone fix up all of this? I'd take a closer look myself if I had more time but I don't, sorry. Devrit 02:52, 16 January 2016 (UTC)

Was a year and three days ago. Removed link. Doc James (talk · contribs · email) 07:33, 16 January 2016 (UTC)

Changes in personality??[edit]

The intro says It often lasts for a few days and can result in dehydration due to fluid loss. Signs of dehydration often begin with loss of the normal stretchiness of the skin and changes in personality. That's the first and last mention of anything psychological. It should either be removed or expanded upon. 92.13.50.149 (talk) 23:34, 4 March 2016 (UTC)

I agree with you and have deleted it now. The hidden reference said WHO (2013). If anyone thinks it's important or knows more about the psychological effects, please expand upon it in the article itself (in which case it can then also be mentioned in the lead).EvMsmile (talk) 11:24, 21 March 2016 (UTC)

Habba syndrome[edit]

...redirects here but without explanation. A brief mention would be nice, if someone knows what it is. Equinox (talk) 12:33, 30 April 2016 (UTC)

Watery[edit]

Chronic - review doi:10.1053/j.gastro.2016.10.014 JFW | T@lk 21:10, 31 January 2017 (UTC)