Talk:End zone

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Pylons[edit]

I think the position of the various pylons in the end zone should be addressed. There are four pylons at each corner of the end zone, but there are also two that are set back from the end zone. What are the purposes of the various pylons? The ones at the corners are in the field of play, but the other two are not, why?? — Preceding unsigned comment added by 76.31.133.113 (talk) 03:37, 28 October 2007

Four corner pylons mark the corners of the end zone, while the two others at the back of the end zone are on the hash marks. Aldrich1987 (talk) 01:31, 18 April 2009 (UTC)

Decorations vs. Teams[edit]

Are you sure the endzones show opposing teams? That wouldn't make sense in terms of indication which team is at each end, because they swap ends at halftime (and in overtime, if it occurs). Furthermore, mostly all a search finds the home team's logo|city|school at both ends of the field.

ESPN has gametime photos of almost all the NFL fields http://espn.go.com/travel/stadium/?stadium=nfl_2837

http://www.pollsb.com/photos/o/79504-buried_meadowlands_end_zone.jpg http://www.apcomedy.com/blog/?p=78 http://sports.espn.go.com/travel/news/story?id=3546633 http://www.nflvenueinfo.com/index.htm http://www.sportsbook-bonus.net/nfl-football/top-5-nfl-stadiums/ http://sports.espn.go.com/travel/news/story?id=3007242 http://www.pictureninja.com/pages/united-states/california/image-stanford-football-stadium.htm http://www.secfootball.itgo.com/benhill.jpg http://www.savethebighouse.com/ http://assets.espn.go.com/photo/2007/0911/travel_harvard_800.jpg http://big12football.net/nebraskafootballstadium.html

http://photography.nationalgeographic.com/photography/photo-of-the-day/football-stadium-pod-best09.html —Preceding unsigned comment added by 66.14.154.3 (talk) 05:45, 15 January 2010 (UTC)

Goal post design[edit]

There is a reference to "T-shaped", but it does not indicate the **curvature** seen nowadays on the stem of the T. This puts the contact between the goal post and the ground BEHIND (not on) the end line, so it is safer. Also, did college football ever have its goal posts on the goal line? The NFL moved the goal posts to the end line in the 1970s because of too many field goals, and as it happens this change also eliminated any forward pass hitting the goal post. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 128.63.16.82 (talk) 18:25, 10 August 2011 (UTC)