Talk:Fixation index

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I'm trying to reproduce the FST results from the Hapmap 3 paper (The International HapMap Consortium. A second generation human haplotype map of over 3.1 million SNPs. Nature 449, 851-861. 2007) and they don't seem to be using the formula provided here. I believe they're using θ as defined by Reynolds, Weir, and Cockerham [Reynolds, John, Weir, B., S., Cockerham, C. Clark, ESTIMATION OF THE COANCESTRY COEFFICIENT: BASIS FOR A SHORT-TERM GENETIC DISTANCE, Genetics 1983 105: 767-779] which is also somewhat complicated. Perhaps this page should just include a simple FST formula, such as would be found in a standard population genetics textbook. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 192.12.88.17 (talk) 00:31, 17 October 2010 (UTC)

This article notes that "Across the autosomes, FST was estimated to be 0.12." but it would be nice to know what this means: Is that large, or small? —Preceding unsigned comment added by Tim bates (talkcontribs) 11:43, 3 June 2008 (UTC)

The 0.12 is a high value and represent populations of high variations (Asian and African origin HapMap populstions). The lowest range in the same HapMAp paper was 0.07. Dr. Rehab Abdel-Rahman —Preceding unsigned comment added by 71.242.172.165 (talk) 03:08, 29 June 2008 (UTC)

I've tried to understand the definition, but I am simply not able to. How do I calculate the variance between different subpopulation? Are the different formulae calculating the same thing (and if so, could the article please explain how?) or does Fst mean differnent things in different contexts? How about an example calculation? 82.134.28.194 (talk) 14:09, 9 April 2013 (UTC)

Don't know if you can read Haskell, but [1] calculates Fst. :-)

Ketil (talk) 12:17, 4 April 2014 (UTC)

And this was useful to me: [2]

Ketil (talk) 12:23, 4 April 2014 (UTC)

Ambiguity[edit]

According to Measures of genetic diversity, pp. 22-24, FST is different from fixation index (F)!Sylwia Ufnalska (talk) 16:29, 2 August 2013 (UTC)

Meaning/relevance/clarification of Harpending's quote on human's FST[edit]

"kinship between two individuals of the same human population is equivalent to kinship between grandparent and grandchild or between half siblings" - what does it mean? That "in the same population" (what a "population" is in the level of analysis?) you could get from any random person essentially the same level of compatibility in organ transplantations than you'd get from your grandparent/child or half-sibling? Whereas between populations/mixed/intermediate populations it would be... ? Perhaps it would also deserve a inter-wiki link to the "kinship" article, "In biology, "kinship" typically refers to the degree of genetic relatedness or coefficient of relationship between individual members of a species (e.g. as in kin selection theory). It may also be used in this specific sense when applied to human relationships, in which case its meaning is closer to consanguinity or genealogy." — Preceding unsigned comment added by 201.68.109.57 (talk) 19:33, 9 August 2016 (UTC)